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ERIC Number: EJ1131439
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2017-Mar
Pages: 17
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 38
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0045-6713
Unstable Space: Mapping the Antarctic for Children in "Heroic Era" Antarctic Literature
Moriarty, Sinead
Children's Literature in Education, v48 n1 p56-72 Mar 2017
This article examines the Antarctic landscape as one of the last places in the world to be explored and mapped, and as one of the most changeable landscapes in the world. The mapping exercises involved in the early, heroic-era Antarctic expeditions, helped to reduce a once mysterious and unknown landscape into a known entity, something that could be contained and restrained through visual representation. These maps focus on the limits of landscape, on the outer edges and the upper peaks and so mapping minimises and places limits upon landscapes, creating an image of the landscape which is static, re-presented for human consumption. The article will, therefore, look at the use of maps in a cross-section of six heroic-era Antarctic non-fiction narratives for children written within the last twenty years, and which recount the early Antarctic expeditions, recreating and re-presenting heroic-era maps as a means of enforcing stasis on this dynamic landscape. The children's stories, such as Michael McCurdy's "Trapped by the Ice!" (1997), Meredith Hooper's "Race to the Pole" (2002), and Dowdeswell, Dowdeswell & Seddon's "Scott of the Antarctic" (2012), show that the stultifying effect of maps is exacerbated in the children's heroic-era narratives as they seek to fix the landscape geographically, as well as temporally, in the early twentieth century. The article will examine the way in which the maps in the modern retellings of heroic-era narratives seek to undermine the mutable nature of the Antarctic in order to present the child reader with an image of the continent, which is dominated by stasis.
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: Antarctica