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ERIC Number: EJ1063495
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2008-Jan
Pages: 25
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1540-4595
The Use of Problem-Based Learning to Enhance MIS Education
Mykytyn, Kathleen; Pearson, Ann; Paul, Souren; Mykytyn, Peter P., Jr.
Decision Sciences Journal of Innovative Education, v6 n1 p89-113 Jan 2008
Many colleges of business require a course in computer applications concepts, often consisting of spreadsheet and database applications. Quite often, students resist taking the class because they do not see any worth to it, it duplicates what they already have taken, and they already know much of what is purported to be taught in the class. Instructors too are often frustrated with this class. This article suggests that part of the problem is the method of instruction often used: lecture and demonstration of tools followed by end-of-chapter assignments. We propose that problem-based learning is an alternative instructional method that may produce more positive results for students. To examine this approach, a semester-long study involving 186 business school students enrolled in a computer applications concept course of seven different sections was conducted. Student motivation, computer self-efficacy, knowledge, and satisfaction were studied. Results strongly support a problem-based learning approach as an instructional approach to teaching this class. [I]t would be naive to regard PBL [Problem-based Learning] as having reached some final stage of development. Indeed, the problem-based approach is certainly not the end of innovation in professional education. Problem-oriented strategies are but one set of examples of the broader category of systemic educational thinking and approaches which emphasize learning from experience (Boud & Feletti, 1998a, p. 13). [I]t would be naive to regard PBL [Problem-based Learning] as having reached some final stage of development. Indeed, the problem-based approach is certainly not the end of innovation in professional education. Problem-oriented strategies are but one set of examples of the broader category of systemic educational thinking and approaches which emphasize learning from experience (Boud & Feletti, 1998a, p. 13).
Wiley-Blackwell. 350 Main Street, Malden, MA 02148. Tel: 800-835-6770; Tel: 781-388-8598; Fax: 781-388-8232; e-mail: cs-journals@wiley.com; Web site: http://www.wiley.com/WileyCDA
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Research
Education Level: Higher Education; Postsecondary Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A