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ERIC Number: ED526378
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2011
Pages: 138
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: ISBN-978-1-1245-4502-8
ISSN: N/A
The Impact of Violence Prevention Programs on School Based Violent Behaviors
Reed-Reynolds, Shelly
ProQuest LLC, Ph.D. Dissertation, TUI University
This dissertation study focused on the potential effect that various violence prevention program strategies implemented within the k-12 school setting have on the frequency of school based violent behaviors. The 2005-06 and 2003-04 School Survey on Crime and Safety (SSOCS:2006 & SSOCS:2004) was utilized as the secondary data source for this research. The SSOCS:2006 survey was based on a nationally representative stratified random sample of 3,565 U.S. public schools. A total of 2,724 public primary, middle, high, and combined schools provided usable questionnaires (NCES, 2007-361). The SSOCS:2004 survey was based on a nationally representative stratified random sample of 3,743 U.S. public schools. A total of 2,772 public primary, middle, high, and combined schools provided usable questionnaires (NCES, 2007335). This study used multiple regression and hierarchical multiple regression to examine the relationship between violence prevention programs and school based violent behaviors. The violence prevention program construct consisted of nine independent variables categorized as violence prevention program strategies and parental involvement. These independent variables consisted of the following: (a) prevention curriculum/instruction/training, (b) behavioral modification for students, (c) student counseling/social work, (d) individual mentoring/tutoring students, (e) student involvement resolving problems, (f) recreation/enrichment student activities, (g) promote sense of community/integration, and (h) hotline/tipline to report problems. The school based violence construct was defined as total number of violent incidents recorded. The covariates to be controlled in this study were (a) minority enrollment, (b) grade level, (c) school size, (d) percentage of limited English proficient students, (e) percentage of special education students, and (f) urbanicity. The results of the SSOCS:2006 hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated the covariates: (a) minority enrollment, (b) primary grade level, (c) middle grade level, (d) percentage of limited English proficient students, (e) percentage of special education students, and (f) school size were found to be of statistical significance in relation to school based violent behaviors. However, the SSOCS:2006 analysis indicated no violence prevention program variables as statistically significant when the covariates were controlled. The results of the SSOCS:2004 hierarchical multiple regression analysis indicated the covariates: (a) minority enrollment, (b) middle grade level, (c) percentage of special education students, and (d) school size were found to be of statistical significance in relation to school based violent behaviors. In addition, the SSOCS:2004 analysis indicated violence prevention program variable student involvement resolving problems as statistically significant when the covariates were controlled. The implications of this research suggest the effectiveness of school based violence prevention program strategies and their relationship to school based violent behaviors may be greatly influenced by the covariates: (a) minority enrollment, (b) grade level, (c) school size, (d) percentage of limited English proficient students, and (e) percentage of special education students. Thus, the demographic covariates within the school environment may be of considerable influence in the success or failure of school based violence prevention program strategies in minimizing school based violent behaviors. This outcome may assist educators in identifying evidenced based violence prevention program strategies that are effective in reducing school based violence. In utilizing evidenced based violence prevention strategies, schools will also meet federal funding regulations, which now mandate quantifiable outcomes in order to satisfy funding requirements. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: Elementary Education; Elementary Secondary Education; High Schools; Middle Schools
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: United States