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ERIC Number: ED148943
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1977-Mar-30
Pages: 31
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Pittsburgh Project - Part I: Community Growth and Survival.
Taylor, Jerome
This paper presents a summary of the first part of the Pittsburgh Project. It deals with white racialism. "Racialism" is a term that is used differently, explained differently, and deployed differently to account for a heterogeneous range of social phenomena. Not uncommonly, assumptions are made that racialism is a unitary rather than a differentiated process, that its determinants are simplistically rather than complexly organized, and that its expression has uniform rather than multiform parameters. This paper offers an alternative to these assumptions by offering a conceptual taxonomy that generates 144 types of racialism. The paper begins by providing the conceptual dimensions for racialism. When a discussion of prejudice is developed along racial or color lines it can be referred to as racialism, a term which distinguishes it from other forms of social prejudice. Racialistic incidents classified by either of the racialistic content categories can vary importantly with respect of various factors, which are then discussed. Given the allocation of racialistic orientations by incident and content categories, a third dimension to consider is defined by attending to those factors which have shaped the racialistic orientation. Such factors are referred to here as sociogenic variables. These 6 variables are then discussed. A conceptual taxonomy of racialism is discussed next, while the section following this maps the conceptual achievements of the previous section into empirical strategies. The final section discusses four measures which have been developed to identify important aspects of the black experience and of general psychological identity. These are: (1) identification with black nationalism, (2) identification with the black herioc social type, (3) development of black consciousness, and (4) development of psychological identity. (Author/AM)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Not Available Separately; See UD 017 651