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ERIC Number: ED078822
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1973-Jul-13
Pages: 43
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Vocational Choice Stability and Career Development.
Scott, Craig S.; And Others
A study was conducted to examine changes in the vocational choices of a national sample of junior-community college students. Holland's psychological classification scheme for vocations--realistic, investigative, conventional artistic, enterprising and social--were used. The dependent variable was constructed by comparing each student's fall, 1970, vocational choice on the Career Planning Profile to his or her spring, 1972, vocational choice on the Career Planning Profile Follow-up Questionnaire. Follow-up questionnaires were sent to and administered by the 62 participating institutions. A total of 4,592 completed questionnaires were returned. Application of four sample selection criteria resulted in a final sample of 2,928. Male changers tended to report more business detail competencies and score slightly higher on trade interests than male nonchangers. Female changers tended to report fewer science competencies and score slightly higher on business contact interests than female nonchangers. Aside from these differences, nonchangers did not differ greatly from changers. Variations were noted in the types of vocational choice change exhibited by individuals whose original choices were in different major categories. Of the 1,498 who changed major categories, 30% changed to the realistic category, 22.5% changed to the investigative category, and 19.7% changed to the social category. Changers differed very little from nonchangers on the interest, ability, and familial background variables. (KM)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association's North Central Special Interest Group for Community-Junior College Research (Ann Arbor, Michigan, July 13, 1973)