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ERIC Number: EJ899673
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2010-Oct
Pages: 10
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 53
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0022-006X
Heterogeneity Moderates Treatment Response among Patients with Binge Eating Disorder
Sysko, Robyn; Hildebrandt, Tom; Wilson, G. Terence; Wilfley, Denise E.; Agras, W. Stewart
Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, v78 n5 p681-690 Oct 2010
Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore heterogeneity and differential treatment outcome among a sample of patients with binge eating disorder (BED). Method: A latent class analysis was conducted with 205 treatment-seeking, overweight or obese individuals with BED randomized to interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), behavioral weight loss (BWL), or guided self-help based on cognitive behavioral therapy (CBTgsh). A latent transition analysis tested the predictive validity of the latent class analysis model. Results: A 4-class model yielded the best overall fit to the data. Class 1 was characterized by a lower mean body mass index (BMI) and increased physical activity. Individuals in Class 2 reported the most binge eating, shape and weight concerns, compensatory behaviors, and negative affect. Class 3 patients reported similar binge eating frequencies to Class 2, with lower levels of exercise or compensation. Class 4 was characterized by the highest average BMI, the most overeating episodes, fewer binge episodes, and an absence of compensatory behaviors. Classes 1 and 3 had the highest and lowest percentage of individuals with a past eating disorder diagnosis, respectively. The latent transition analysis found a higher probability of remission from binge eating among those receiving IPT in Class 2 and CBTgsh in Class 3. Conclusions: The latent class analysis identified 4 distinct classes using baseline measures of eating disorder and depressive symptoms, body weight, and physical activity. Implications of the observed differential treatment response are discussed. (Contains 5 tables and 2 footnotes.)
American Psychological Association. Journals Department, 750 First Street NE, Washington, DC 20002-4242. Tel: 800-374-2721; Tel: 202-336-5510; Fax: 202-336-5502; e-mail: order@apa.org; Web site: http://www.apa.org/publications
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A