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ERIC Number: EJ985236
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2012-Mar
Pages: 2
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 1
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0269-2465
New Models for Initial Teacher Education in Scotland
Kibble, Bob
Primary Science, n122 p32-33 Mar 2012
In this article, the author responds to the recent article by Lynne Bianchi commenting on the Donaldson report, "Teaching Scotland's future" (Donaldson, 2011). He agrees that the Donaldson report has indeed been a catalyst to drive change across the entire landscape of initial teacher education (ITE) in Scotland. In fact, not only ITE: the report has much to say about ongoing professional development and about partnership approaches to teacher education. It is interesting how a report, compiled apparently by an individual, can have such a wide-reaching effect on schools across an entire nation. Far from being an interesting report with recommendations, "Teaching Scotland's future" is fast assuming biblical status! Bianchi quite rightly made reference to the broader professional nature of what it means to be a teacher and the author agrees that engagement beyond the classroom, be it via science centres, the Association for Science Education regions, the National Science Learning Centre or the pages of "Primary Science," is critical to personal and professional advancement. However, in this article, which continues to draw on the Donaldson report, the author raises some important issues about the preparation of new teachers, issues that are occupying front-line thinking in his own institution, and other issues that have arisen on the back of the Donaldson report. On the drawing board in Scotland's ITE institutions, or rather in e-space, are new models for ITE that are predicated on particular and not altogether healthy, in his opinion, interpretations of the Donaldson report.
Association for Science Education. College Lane Hatfield, Herts, AL10 9AA, UK. Tel: +44-1-707-283000; Fax: +44-1-707-266532; e-mail: info@ase.org.uk; Web site: http://www.ase.org.uk
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Opinion Papers
Education Level: Higher Education
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Location: United Kingdom (Scotland)