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ERIC Number: EJ904417
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2004-May
Pages: 5
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: 23
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-1080-4013
Sleep and Arousal Mechanisms in Experimental Epilepsy: Epileptic Components of NREM and Antiepileptic Components of REM Sleep
Shouse, M. N.; Scordato, J. C.; Farber, P. R.
Mental Retardation and Developmental Disabilities Research Reviews, v10 n2 p117-121 May 2004
Neural generators related to different sleep components have different effects on seizure discharge. These sleep-related systems can provoke seizure discharge propagation during nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep and can suppress propagation during REM sleep. Experimental manipulations of discrete physiological components were conducted in feline epilepsy models, mostly in the systemic penicillin epilepsy model of primary generalized epilepsy and the amygdala kindling model of the localization-related seizure disorder, temporal lobe epilepsy. The sleep-wake state distribution of seizures was quantified before and after discrete lesions, systemic and localized drug administration, and/or photic stimulation, as well as in relation to microdialysis of norepinephrine. We found that (1) neural generators of synchronous EEG oscillations--including tonic background slow waves and phasic "arousal" events (sleep EEG transients such as sleep spindles and k-complexes)--combine to promote electrographic seizure propagation during NREM and drowsiness, and antigravity muscle tone permits seizure-related movement; (2) neural generators of asynchronous neuronal discharge patterns reduce electrographic seizures during alert waking and REM sleep, and skeletal motor paralysis blocks seizure-related movement during REM; (3) there are a number of similarities between amygdala-kindled kittens and children with Landau-Kleffner Syndrome (LKS) that suggest a link among seizures, sleep disorders, and behavioral abnormalities/regression. (Contains 1 table and 3 figures.)
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Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A