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ERIC Number: ED555487
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2013
Pages: 226
Abstractor: As Provided
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: 978-1-3034-4654-2
ISSN: N/A
Organizational Cultures and Employees' Propensity to File Claims and/or Engage in Litigious Conduct
Abracosa, Gerilynn P.
ProQuest LLC, Ed.D. Dissertation, University of La Verne
Purpose: The purposes of this study were to (a) investigate the connections between aspects of organizational cultures and employees' propensity to file claims and/or engage in litigious conduct against their organization, (b) ascertain behaviors of managers and supervisors implicitly sanctioned by the organization's culture that trigger employees to file claims and/or engage in litigious conduct, (c) identify preventive measures organizations can implement to deter employees from filing claims and/or engaging in litigious conduct, and (d) determine the feasibility of implementing the preventive measures. Methodology: The participants in the present study were 15 human resources professionals and practitioners in the field of higher education. Participants served as panel members in a Policy Delphi study. Two rounds of questionnaires were administered using an Internet-based electronic survey program, SurveyMonkey.com. In both rounds, panel members provided their opinions in answering the research questions. Findings: There were 8 specific dimensions of organizational culture that were strongly connected to keeping employees from filing claims or lawsuits. Behaviors of supervisors and managers that trigger employees to file claims and/or engage in litigious conduct reflect the absence of organizational justice, primarily interactional justice. As expected, preventive measures that will deter employees from filing claims and/or engaging in litigious conduct reflect elements of organizational justice, primarily interactional justice. There were also a number of effective preventive measures organizations can very feasibly implement to mitigate the risk of a claim or a lawsuit. Recommendations: Organizations should adopt policies and practices that reflect the cultural dimensions identified as strongly connected in keeping employees from filing claims or lawsuits. As the primary ambassadors of organizational values to the employees, midlevel managers should be properly trained to provide them with the skills and resources in the practice of interactional (informational and interpersonal) justice, thereby improving the relationship and work-related attitudes and behaviors of employees. Conclusions: There are substantial connections between aspects of organizational cultures and employees' propensity to file claims and/or engage in litigious conduct. Organizations seeking ways to reduce their exposure to the risk of claims and litigation should incorporate elements of a healthy corporate character and organizational justice in their organizational cultures. [The dissertation citations contained here are published with the permission of ProQuest LLC. Further reproduction is prohibited without permission. Copies of dissertations may be obtained by Telephone (800) 1-800-521-0600. Web page: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml.]
ProQuest LLC. 789 East Eisenhower Parkway, P.O. Box 1346, Ann Arbor, MI 48106. Tel: 800-521-0600; Web site: http://www.proquest.com/en-US/products/dissertations/individuals.shtml
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A