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50 Years of ERIC
50 Years of ERIC
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ERIC Number: EJ787354
Record Type: Journal
Publication Date: 2001
Pages: 8
Abstractor: ERIC
Reference Count: 5
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-0018-1498
Use of Ethical Dilemmas to Contribute to the Knowledge and Behavior of High School Students
Vincent, Annette; Meche, Melanie
High School Journal, v84 n4 p50-57 Apr-May 2001
In the educational environment, there is increasing interest in the teaching of ethics. At one time teaching was teaching ethics. Ethics was taught through literature, history, and other courses where applicable. Today, there is diminishing influence of churches and families in instilling ethical values to the youth, causing widespread decline in ethical standards. This decline creates a need for attention to ethics education, leading to attempts by educational systems to teach ethics in the academic environment. This article presents examples of the movement toward including ethics education in the curriculum. This article also presents results of an ethics study conducted by Vincent and Meche (1995) which determine knowledge of ethical principles and ethical behavior in ethical dilemmas of college freshmen and seniors. They sought to determine whether ethics instruction made a significance in knowledge and behavior. Seniors had received ethics instruction in college courses. Results showed that an average of 22 percent of freshmen did not recognize unethical situations; and an average of 41 percent of freshmen would participate in unethical behavior. An average of 1 percent of seniors did not recognize unethical situations; and an average of 18 percent of seniors would participate in unethical behavior. An analysis of variance of responses to knowledge of ethical principles showed a significant difference at the 0.01 level in means of responses of freshmen and responses of seniors, showing that significantly more freshmen did not recognize unethical situations. An analysis of variance of responses to behavior in each situation showed a significant difference at the 0.01 level in means of responses of freshmen and seniors, indicating that significantly more freshmen would behave unethically. Strategies for teaching ethics are also presented.
University of North Carolina Press. 116 South Boundary Street, P.O. Box 2288, Chapel Hill, NC 27515-2288. Tel: 800-848-6224; Tel: 919-966-7449; Fax: 919-962-2704; e-mail: uncpress@unc.edu; Web site: http://uncpress.unc.edu/journals/j-hsj.html
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: High Schools
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A