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ERIC Number: ED382004
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1994-May
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Linguistic Assimilation of Westerners Living in the Yoruba Area of Nigeria.
Strong, W. F.
This study investigated the strategies used by westerners, particularly American, Canadians, and Britons, to assimilate linguistically with the Yoruba people of southwestern Nigeria. The report begins with a brief chronicling of the history of colonialism and English usage in Nigeria. The study is then described. Based on observation of interactions between westerners and Yorubas, a list of 58 commonly-used terms and expressions in Yoruba, British English, Nigerian, and pidgin was compiled. Using this, a survey instrument was constructed to determine patterns of usage, attitudes, and stages of assimilation of westerners. Respondents (n=42) were scholars, professionals, foreign government employees, western-raised spouses of Nigerians, and university students. Results indicate that for many westerners, code-switching was necessary due to the amount of British English in common usage. Significant usage of pidgin words and word patterns was found. In addition, use of Yoruba words was found to be socially advantageous. Based on these findings, it is concluded that use of expressions in this list correlated negatively with expatriates' frustration levels in daily life in the region. Further research and development of findings is anticipated. (MSE)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: English (British); Nigeria; Yoruba (Tribe)
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Speech Communication Association (New Orleans, LA, November 19-20, 1994).