NotesFAQContact Us
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED370539
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Oct-30
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Information Technology as the Paradigm High-Speed Management Support Tool: The Uses of Computer Mediated Communication, Virtual Realism, and Telepresence.
Newby, Gregory B.
Information technologies such as computer mediated communication (CMC), virtual reality, and telepresence can provide the communication flow required by high-speed management techniques that high-technology industries have adopted in response to changes in the climate of competition. Intra-corporate CMC might be used for a variety of purposes directed at supporting and generating products. Intercorporate CMC has to do with the exchange of information among individuals of workgroups at different corporations. Extra-corporate CMC is used to interact with and scan the larger environment. Management applications for virtual reality (VR) have largely not yet emerged. However, there are advances in production, design, training, and testing which have resulted from VR technology. The human side of VR software requires considerable work before real-world applications become prevalent in the business community. The implications of telepresence for high-speed management are far-reaching; telepresence can provide the capability for people in geographically distant areas to interact in real time. The two main problems with telepresence technology are the time lag and presentation of self at the remote site. Information technology has the potential to modify corporate structure and affect corporate values, and so should be of interest to scholars and managers interested in the role of emerging technologies. (Contains 34 references.) (MES)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Practitioners; Students; Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Organizational Technology; Telepresence; Transnational Corporations; Virtual Reality
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Speech Communication Association (78th, Chicago, IL, October 29-November 1, 1992).