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ERIC Number: ED362466
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990-Jul
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Educational Development and Reform on the Soviet Periphery: Mongolian People's Republic and Lao People's Democratic Republic.
Spaulding, Seth
Journal of Asian and African Affairs, v2 n1 p109-124 Jul 1990
This document examines educational reforms that have occurred in Mongolia and Laos. Both nations have expanded educational opportunity drastically over the years. Both had extensive literacy campaigns following the establishment of socialism. Laos has undertaken development projects with the support of the USSR, Eastern European countries, and Vietnam. Mongolia, which has been closely affiliated with the USSR since the 1920s, has strong Russian and English language programs and educational exchange programs with Vietnam. The curriculum in both countries emphasizes science and technology. Both countries suffer from a scarcity of instructional materials, although both employ audiovisual aids. Mongolia and Laos recognize the need to improve teacher education. International agencies support teacher training projects, particularly in the area of secondary level mathematics and science. Both countries are the beneficiaries of overseas development assistance programs; still, both continue to face significant educational finance and administration problems. At present, Laos and Mongolia are undergoing economic liberalization. Mongolia has a tradition of trade ties with the West, and Laos resembles the free market economy of Thailand. There is little educational research in either country. Future research could explore practical issues of educational quantity, and quality, while theoretical questions of democratization and ideology remain. Glasnost and perestroika in the USSR may encourage such research. (SG)
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Laos; Mongolia; USSR
Note: A version of this paper was presented at the World Conference of Comparative Education Societies (Montreal, Quebec, Canada, June 26-30, 1989).