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ERIC Number: ED349508
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Sep
Pages: 27
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Do the Leaders of Counselor Education Programs Think Graduate Students Should Be Required To Participate in Personal Counseling: The Results of a National Survey.
D'Andrea, Michael; Daniels, Judy
It is ironic to think that persons who experience substantial personal and interpersonal problems as a result of the stress in their own lives might end up providing mental health services to clients or be responsible for training graduate students to become professional counselors. Research by White and Franzoni (1990) substantiated the prevalent belief that many mental health professionals are emotionally damaged and have chosen their vocation to solve their own problems. It has been suggested that the rate of personal problems, which numerous researchers have noted to be manifested among many professional counselors and counselor educators, might be substantially reduced if counselor education programs implemented stricter admissions-retention policies and incorporated specific requirements intentionally designed to promote students' personal development. This study assessed what chairpersons and/or directors (N=122) of accredited counselor educator training programs thought about requiring all graduate students to participate in professional counseling as a programmatic requirement. Respondents were surveyed regarding characteristics of their programs, personal problems of students, and attitudes towards a policy requiring personal counseling. Minimal support was found for the notion that personal counseling should be a programmatic requirement for graduate students. Only 34% of the chairpersons supported the recommendation that problem students should be required to obtain professional counseling as a part of a remedial plan to enable them to continue in the program. (ABL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A