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ERIC Number: ED335912
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990-Apr
Pages: 18
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The French Graduate Business School: A Model for Instruction in the American Classroom.
Carney, William J.
The organization and curriculum of the French graduate business schools, the 16 regional Ecoles Superieures de Commerce et d'Administration des Entreprises, has much to offer for pedagogical development in United States business administration education. The schools parallel the university system but provide a more narrowly focused, practically-oriented educational experience. Like American state institutions, the regional schools are competitive, tax-supported, and concerned with accountability. Curriculum consists of four components, including: required courses, electives, internships, and projects. Students may remain generalists or specialize. The language department is well integrated into the institutions' academic structure, with the full-time English professors, all fluent in French, working closely with colleagues on all four components of the curriculum. Several characteristics of one English program have value for U.S. business schools: English is cross-cultural and integrative, commercially-oriented, immediately motivating and reinforcing; productive and goal-oriented, subject to rigid outcomes assessment; and multi-dimensional. Five areas in which this school model could be a stimulus for U.S. schools include the following: materials and course organization; student initiative and motivation; interdepartmental cooperation; assessment of oral mastery; and cooperation with area business and industry. (MSE)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: France
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Eastern Michigan University Conference on Languages and Communication for Business and the Professions (9th, Ypsilanti, MI April 5-7, 1990).