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ERIC Number: ED327912
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990
Pages: 26
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Improving Student Achievement through Enhancing the Instructional Communication Competence of Teachers.
Fenton, Ray; O'Leary, Neil
A teacher communication skills training program to improve instruction, Teacher Expectations and Student Achievement (TESA), is described in this report, with a focus on the effect of improved instructional communication competence on academic achievement. In particular, the advocates of TESA hope that communication skills training will have a positive effect on the progress of low achievers and minority students. Methodology involved the administration of program evaluations to 27 principals and 2 groups of participating teachers: 118 teachers completed an assessment after the third workshop and 96 completed an end assessment. Results of pre- and post-achievement tests of 1,366 students for the years 1983-89 were also analyzed. Findings indicate that the program failed to significantly increase the academic achievement of minority students and low achievers; however, most of the teachers and approximately half of the principals reported changed instructional behaviors and improved student attitudes and achievement. The discrepant outcomes indicate that the program's underlying concept of instructional communication is problematic because of the lack of a relational orientation. Observations are made about the interaction between various communication behaviors, and the recommendation is made for development of a relational model of instructional communication that focuses on teacher-student characteristics and behaviors, the educational context, goals, and outcomes. Three statistical tables are included. (54 references) (LMI)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Anchorage School District AK
Note: Paper prepared for the Annual Meeting of the Communication and Instruction Division of the Western States Communication Association (Phoenix, AZ, February 1991).