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ERIC Number: ED326547
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990-Nov-9
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Measurement Integrity of the Family Needs Survey.
Sexton, David; And Others
The 35-item Family Needs Survey (FNS) is purported both to facilitate the acquisition of the parent's perspective on needs of families with handicapped children and to possess prescriptive utility. The FNS directs parents to indicate if they definitely do have a need, definitely do not have a need, or are uncertain if they have a need in six different categories of needs: information, support, explaining to others, community services, financial, and family functioning. In this study, the measurement integrity of data collected using the FNS was investigated. Data provided by 53 mothers of young handicapped children were subjected to both classical test theory analyses and factor analysis. Subjects' mean age was 30 years; their children ranged in age from 4 to 64 months, with a mean age of 36 months. According to generic classifications, 38 (71.7%) of the children had mild/moderate handicaps, while 12 (22.6%) had severe/profound handicaps. Types of handicaps reported included developmental disabilities, mental retardation, cerebral palsy, spina bifida, and others. The areas that the mothers considered "definite" needs were also compared with those of similar analyses conducted in a previous study. Results suggest that the FNS is a reasonably valid measure of family needs. The instrument can be used to facilitate the development of individualized family service plans for infants and toddlers and the formulation of school and community workshops or programs for parents of young children with handicaps. Three data tables and one graph are included. (TJH)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Family Needs Survey; Parent Surveys
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Mid-South Educational Research Association (19th, New Orleans, LA, November 14-16, 1990).