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ERIC Number: ED246451
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984
Pages: 28
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Teaching of Writing: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," January through June 1984, (Vol. 44 Nos. 7 through 12).
ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.
This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 38 titles deal with a variety of topics, including the following: (1) revision using electronic word processing; (2) photography as an intervention strategy in the verbal composing process; (3) the effects of planning processes and communicative effectiveness of competent writers; (4) the aims and methods of interactive response to student writing; (5) the utilization of computer technology as a means of teaching and evaluating prewriting processes; (6) teacher attitudes and practices in composition instruction; (7) the logic of business writing; (8) the effect of the small peer writing group; (9) topic, theme, and mode in unassigned writing of first grade students using invented spelling in an open classroom; (10) effects of newspaper reading, free writing, and guided writing on writing quality; (11) heuristic approaches to the teaching of creative writing at the college level; (12) critical thinking and writing; (13) F. Christensen's generative rhetoric and its influence on the syntactic maturity and writing effectiveness of selected freshman students; (14) the effects of sentence combining on writing ability; (15) students' perceptions of practices in composition instruction in grades three, four, five, and six; (16) the development of an interactive technical writing curriculum through action research. (HOD)
Publication Type: Reference Materials - Bibliographies
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.
Identifiers: Invented Spelling
Note: Pages may be marginally legible.