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ERIC Number: ED246377
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984-Apr
Pages: 32
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Multistage Path Models of Adolescent Alcohol and Drug Use: A Reanalysis.
Hays, Ron; And Others
Using a path analysis on simplex pattern models of adolescent drug use, Potvin and Lee (1980) studied the personality and perceived environmental variables associated with drug use. To evaluate the appropriateness of the drug use models derived by Potvin and Lee, a structural modeling methodology using LISREL VI was applied to the data from their study. The Potvin and Lee study used interview data from a national probability sample of 585 girls and 536 boys, divided into three age groups: early adolescence (13-14 year olds); middle adolescence (15-16 year olds); and late adolescence (17-18 year olds). An analysis of the results showed that contrary to the original results reported by Potvin and Lee, a nonsimplex pattern of relations among different forms of drug use was found to hold for two of the three different age groups sampled (early adolescence and late adolescence). The personality dimensions of conformity-commitment and religiousness had consistent negative effects on drug use in each sample. Among young adolescents, increased conformity led directly to decreased marijuana use. Parental support-affection and parental approval of friends had effects on drug use in two of three samples (middle adolescence and late adolescence). Self-esteem and alienation were consistently unrelated to drug use. These findings suggest that the reanalysis of the Potvin and Lee study provided a more comprehensive test of theoretical models of drug use. (Author/BL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: California Univ., Riverside.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Social Learning Theory
Note: Expanded version of a paper presented at the Annual Convention of the Rocky Mountain Psychological Association (Las Vegas, NV, April 25-28, 1984).