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ERIC Number: ED246364
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984-May
Pages: 46
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Interpersonal Dominance and Coronary-Prone Behavior.
Yarnold, Paul R.; Grimm, Laurence G.
Exploratory research has indicated that interpersonal dominance is one of the strongest correlates of Type A behavior, although little effort has been made to demonstrate a link between the behavioral manifestation of interpersonal dominance and Pattern A responding. To establish such a link two studies were conducted. In the first study, extreme A (N=12) and extreme B (N=11) subjects, as determined by the Jenkins Activity Survey, judged differences in stimuli following an Asch conformity paradigm. The results, which were significant, showed that Type B subjects conformed twice as much as Type A subjects. The same task administered to a subset of the sample and a larger normative sample indicated that social pressure to conform was responsible for differences in judgmental accuracy of stimuli (conformity measure). In the second study, all possible combinations of extreme As (N=42) and Bs (N=42) were matched in dyads to negotiate extreme bi-polar opposite positions on a "teacher dismissal" issue. Analysis of the process and outcome behaviors suggested that Type A individuals were unilaterally more dominant than their Type B counterparts. Future research is needed to define the situational parameters of the Type A individual's dominance behavior and the physiological concomitants of dominance struggles. (Author/BL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Dominant Behavior; Type B Behavior; Type A Behavior
Note: Experiment one was supported by a grant from the University of Illinois Office of Social Science Research. See ED 237 900 for an earlier version. Portions of experiment two, based on the first author's Master's thesis, were presented at the Annual Meeting of the Midwestern Psychological Association (56th, Chicago, IL, May 3-5, 1984).