NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
PDF pending restoration PDF pending restoration
ERIC Number: ED245834
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984-Apr
Pages: 5
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Effects of Question Answering versus Elaboration on Children's Incidental Memory.
Kee, Daniel W.
The aims of this study were (1) to assess the relative effectiveness of verbal and visual elaboration prompts and question-answering prompts on children's incidental memory, and (2) to determine whether performance improvement associated with pictorial elaboration could be augmented by either verbal elaboration or question-answering procedures. Forty-eight 5- and 6-year-old children were randomly assigned in equal numbers to one of six experimental conditions in two one-way experimental designs. Subjects were presented with a 20-item list of noun pairs under incidental memory conditions. Pairs were presented at a rate of 12 seconds per pair on the inspection trial; after an interval of 30 seconds, subjects were given a surprise cued recall test. Conditions in the first experiment were control, pictorial elaboration, verbal elaboration, and question-answering. Conditions in the second experiment were pictorial elaboration, pictorial elaboration plus verbal elaboration, and pictorial elaboration plus question-answering. Results indicated that both the question-answering and the two elaboration conditions facilitated incidental memory; question-answering and verbal elaboration conditions were superior to the pictorial elaboration condition. Further, results indicated that incidental memory performance associated with a pictorial condition can be enhanced by requiring the subject to verbally elaborate the pair relationship or respond to a "Why?" question. (RH)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Elaborative Prompts; Incidental Memory; Question and Answer Exercises
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Western Psychological Association (Los Angeles, CA, April, 1984).