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ERIC Number: ED222539
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Feb
Pages: 17
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
High School Students Preference for and Sense of Understanding of the Holland Vocational Interest Categories. Research Report.
Athanasou, James A.
Information concerning the extent to which the Holland interest classification was preferred and understood by high school students was investigated. Students were asked to show their preference and indicate which classification was more easily understood when the Holland and Kuder interest classifications were presented. A large majority reported preference for the Kuder classification. A second study compared the Holland typology to a British adaptation which emphasized work-task dimensions. A slight majority of students indicated they preferred the Careers Research and Advisory Centre adaptation and most reported it made more sense than the Holland typology. A final study compared the activity preference of the Kuder with a combined typology with work-task classification of Holland interest categories. In this study, most students preferred the Kuder classification and indicated it was more easily understood. This preliminary study indicated students preferred classifications which indicated activity preferences. Junior high school students preferred the Kuder classification. The practical implications for vocational guidance and interest assessment related to the structuring and delivery of career information are discussed. Findings were relevant to computer assisted guidance packages and self-assessment procedures based on self-categorization of interests. (Author/DWH)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: New South Wales Dept. of Industrial Relations and Technology, Darlinghurst (Australia). Div. of Vocational Guidance Services.
Identifiers: Holland Vocational Preference Inventory; Kuder Occupational Interest Survey
Note: Pages 6-9 are marginally legible due to small print.