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ERIC Number: ED212532
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981
Pages: 139
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Rise of Nationalism: Freedom Regained. Through African Eyes: Cultures in Change, Unit V.
Clark, Leon E., Ed.
The exciting period after World War II, when independence movements developed and flourished throughout Africa is the topic of this book, fifth in a series dealing with African culture and intended for secondary level students. Almost all of the selections in the book were written by Africans and come from a variety of sources including autobiographies, novels and stories, newspaper accounts, speeches, official documents, and underground leaflets. The basic purpose of the book is to capture some of the feelings, aspirations, and experiences of black Africans and, by so doing, help the reader develop a sense of empathy and a feeling of identity with human begins everywhere, recognizing the common humanity that all men share. Discussion questions are provided for the selections. World War II is usually considered to be the great dividing line between the colonial period and the period of independence which is still unfolding in Africa. Prior to World War II, there were only three independent African states: Egypt, Ethiopia, and Liberia. Today, only 20 years later, there are 38. Some examples of reading selections follow. One short story tells about a young African who becomes aware of the injustice of racial discrimination and decides to do something about it. Another selection deals with the myth of the African "child." The new politics of Nkrumah are described in one reading. The injustices that the Congolese suffered under Belgian rule are recalled in a speech by Patrice Lumumba. (Author/RM)
CITE Books, 777 United Nations Plaza, Suite 9-H, New York, NY 10017 ($5.95).
Publication Type: Guides - Classroom - Learner
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Council on International and Public Affairs, New York, NY.; Center for International Training and Education, New York, NY.
Identifiers: Africa
Note: Some photographs throughout the document may not reproduce well from EDRS in microfiche or paper copy. For related documents, see SO 013 828-833.