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ERIC Number: ED202418
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981-Apr
Pages: 16
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Adaptation of Interpersonal Process Recall and a Theory of Educating for the Improvement of College Instruction.
Taylor-Way, David G.
An adapted form of interpersonal process recall (IPR) and a theory of educating are described. IPR, which was originally conceived as a method for interpersonal counseling, may help college teachers improve their instruction, based on the conceptual framework derived from D. B. Gowin's (1981) theory of educating. The adapted recall technique involves the teacher, an inquirer, and several of the teacher's students who watch a videotape of teaching. The teacher and students use the videotape to recall thoughts and feelings that had taken place during the original teaching episode. The inquirer attempts to get the teacher to attend to the regularities in his or her teaching, to conceptualize those regularities, and to develop principles of instruction out of those concepts. Teachers are encouraged to express their thoughts and feelings about teaching so that these can be recorded over time as they are modified. Three pertinent principles derived from Gowin's theory of educating are as follows: (1) that a knowledge of the interconnections between feelings, thoughts and actions is critical to establishing a sense of educative value; (2) that by making records of covert teaching events such as expressions of thoughts and feelings of both teachers and their students there is a means of understanding the meaning of overt events such as actions, and for research purposes; and (3) that by maintaining the interrelationships between the events of teaching there is one way of using facts to improve the conceptualization of teaching events and of converting tested concepts into criteria of teaching excellence. Research conducted at Cornell University to test the effectiveness of the adapted recall technique with teaching assistants is summarized. (SW)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY. Coll. of Arts and Sciences.; EXXON Education Foundation, New York, NY.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Gowin (D B); Interpersonal Process Recall
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Los Angeles, CA, April 13-17, 1981).