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ERIC Number: ED179673
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1979
Pages: 75
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
School Resegregation: Residential and School Process Study; A Collaborative Leadership Planning/Training Project. Executive Summary, Third Year Report: 1978-79.
Williams, Georgia
This is the final report of a research project designed to develop a model for leadership in school desegregation. The model was to be based on a collaborative process involving city and school decision makers in Berkeley, California. As part of background information, the racial composition of the Berkeley Unified School District is described. The history of school desegregation in Berkeley, including a tendency toward resegregation since 1972, is reviewed. Activities of the leadership planning/training project, designed to explore and reverse the resegregation process, are outlined and major findings for each of the three years of the project are presented. Numerous shortcomings of the project are mentioned, including the absence of participation of the University of California and of other sectors of the community, gaps in general data and in information on groups other than blacks and whites, and insufficient dialogue regarding dissemination and analysis of previous project reports. Nontheless, it is held that the model developed is viable and exportable to other communities for the purpose of providing leadership training for top city/school dicision makers. Appended to the reports are data on student enrollment in Berkeley, achievement test results, as well as excerpts from previous project reports. (GC)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC. Educational Equity Group. Desegregation Studies Div.
Authoring Institution: Berkeley Unified School District, CA.
Identifiers: California (Berkeley)
Note: Not available in paper copy due to reproduction quality of original document; Attachments A and B may be marginally legible