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ERIC Number: ED179447
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1964
Pages: 136
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Handbook for the Emergence of Civilization.
O'Neill, David; And Others
This handbook, prepared through the Anthropology Curriculum Study Project in Chicago, Illinois, is designed to accompany the secondary level textbook, "The Emergence of Civilization" (SO 012 148) written in 1964. The textbook emphasizes the comparison of the patterns of culture change which resulted in complex societies (civilizations) in six different areas throughout the world. The textbook stresses problem solving and is centered around three questions: In what manner and through what stages did these civilizations evolve? What characteristics of each region promoted this emergence? What is civilization? The six chapters of this handbook provide supplementary readings, daily schedules, commentary on the material, homework assignments, and class activities. Chapter I provides methods for acquainting students with the main objectives of the book and with archeological terms. Chapter II emphasizes the sequence of events in the emergence of a civilization. Chapters III and IV present case studies of Mesopotamia and Peru. In Chapter V student groups compare the previous case studies with either Egypt, the Indus Valley, China, or Middle America. Chapter VI concentrates on theories about the origin of civilization. The emphasis is on students' comparing their own hypotheses with major theories. A glossary of archeological terms is included. (KC)
Publication Type: Guides - Classroom - Teacher
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Science Foundation, Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Anthropology Curriculum Study Project; Central America; China; Egypt; Indus Valley; Mesopotamia; Mexico; Peru
Note: For a related document, see SO 012 148; Articles entitled "The Origin of Cities" and "The Agricultural Revolution" reprinted from Scientific American and "The Achievement and Early Consequences of Food-Production: A Consideration of the Archeological and Natural-Historical Evidence" reprinted from Social Sciences have been removed by ERIC due to copyright law. Several charts and Chapter 6 removed due to poor reproducibility