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ERIC Number: ED168299
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978
Pages: 23
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Ethnic Attitudes and Language Usage.
Crosthwait, Charles; Billiard, Charles E.
The purpose of the study reported here was: (1) to determine whether any predictable relationships exist between the spoken language patterns of individuals and those individuals' ethnic attitudes; and (2) to identify the degree of association present among various selected demographic factors, language patterns, and ethnic attitudes. The particular questions under study here sought information on the relation of standard-nonstandard language patterns to ethnic attitudes on a black-white racial base. Recordings were made of interviews with 162 Atlanta Metropolitan area residents who were classified according to educational level and to the kind of speech they used (standard or nonstandard). The data collected were analyzed as follows: (1) each subject's speech was classified; (2) subjects received numerical scores on the Cultural Attitude Scales (Anglo-Black); (3) subjects were sorted into groups based on the demographic data collected; and (4) a multiple regression computation was used to assess the relationship of scores on the cultural attitude scales to speech, education level, race, age group, and sex. A Pearson correlation was also computed on all of the above categories of data. It is noted that educational level seems to be the best predictor of speech pattern. From the findings, it is concluded that (1) nonstandard speech patterns and black race when found together may predict high black ethnic preference; and (2) in this study, none of the variables have predictive value for ethnic attitude toward whites. (AMH)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Ethnic Attitudes
Note: Paper presented at the convention of the National Council for Social Studies (Houston, Texas, November 22, 1978); Parts may be marginally legible due to light print