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ERIC Number: ED158698
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978
Pages: 94
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Utilization of Manpower and Labor Market Data in College and University Planning: An Exploratory Study. Final Report.
Brazziel, William
A small-sample exploratory investigation is reported that attempted to develop some initial insights regarding the uses of manpower and labor market data in new planning, the needs for new types and forms of data, the nature of program changes generated, and the needs for further research and development. Planning models and program change data were solicited from 76 selected institutions through a structured personal letter and a seven-point Likert scale with 24 possible policy initiatives. Seven institutions were then selected as representative of varied uses of labor market data in planning. Analyses of these institutions' data uses, program changes, and planning models constitute a section of this report entitled Policy Initiatives Utilizing Labor Market Data. That section is preceded by a section called Institutional Attributes containing statistical profiles of the several types of institutions in the sample and which tests the hypothesis that these schools are representative of most American colleges and universities. The bulk of the report is a section called Site Visits, followed by a section entitled Site Visit Theme Analysis. Site visits are reported for Alma College, Central Michigan University, Colorado Mountain College, University of Oregon, St. Cloud University, Washington Technical Institute, and Willamette University. Appended are excerpts from the Minnesota Higher Education Coordinating Board, the Montana Commission of Postsecondary Education, and the University of Wisconsin System. (LBH)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (DHEW), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Connecticut Univ., Storrs.
Identifiers: Minnesota; Montana; Planning Methods; University of Wisconsin System
Note: May not reproduce clearly due to colored paper