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ERIC Number: ED031996
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1968-Sep-14
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Directions and Processes of Educational Change in Higher Education.
Miller, Richard I.
This paper presents some views of several authorities on 4 current trends in higher education, and suggests that the direction of higher education in the seventies may be toward more effective management and organizational procedures that might improve instruction and learning. The trends are: (1) the accentuated search for ways of coping with the knowledge explosion; Gerald Hoyt and Gilbert Burck point out the significance of the "information explosion" in world history and the growing importance of knowledge in technically advanced nations. (2) the continued deterioration of liberal arts education; Lewis Mayhew opposes Clark Kerr's favorable evaluation of the British college-German research institute blend in US higher education, and calls the union of research and service functions the biggest problem facing the field today. (3) the acceleration of student unrest; Edward Shoben and James Michener identify main issues: Vietnam, racial injustice, middle-class values, and others. (4) the acceleration of faculty organization; Logan Wilson and Archie Dykes found that American Council on Education surveys reveal a widespread use of collective bargaining to determine faculty salaries and employment conditions, and faculty confusion about their role in governance. Another section presents the views of C.P. Snow on the process of change, and of John Dietrich, Everett Rogers, Richard Evans and Peter Lepmann on what innovation should be, how it should take place, and the characteristics of real innovators. (WM)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Kentucky Univ., Lexington. Coll. of Education.
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Speech given before the administration faculties of Southwest Minnesota State College and St. Benedict's College, September 14, 1968