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ERIC Number: ED019999
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1967-Feb
Pages: 1
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
THE CHILD WHO DISLIKES GOING TO SCHOOL.
MITCHELL, SHEILA; SHEPHERD, MICHAEL
THIS INVESTIGATION, WHICH TOOK PLACE IN ENGLAND, COMPARES THE ATTITUDES TOWARD SCHOOL OF A RANDOM SAMPLING OF 6,100 5- TO 15-YEAR-OLD PUPILS WITH THEIR PERFORMANCE AND BEHAVIOR AT SCHOOL. PARENTS OF EACH PUPIL WERE SENT A QUESTIONNAIRE WHICH REQUIRED AN ASSESSMENT OF THEIR CHILD'S ATTITUDE TOWARD SCHOOL. IN ADDITION, INFORMATION WAS REQUESTED ON THE CHILD'S HOME BEHAVIOR AND ON THE FAMILY'S SOCIOECONOMIC STATUS. THE TEACHERS OF THESE PUPILS WERE ASKED TO SUPPLY INFORMATION ABOUT EACH PUPIL'S ACADEMIC ATTAINMENT LEVEL, ATTENDANCE RECORD, AND IN-SCHOOL BEHAVIOR. THE DATA, UPON ANALYSIS, LED TO SEVERAL CONCLUSIONS. (1) GIRLS, GENERALLY, HAVE A MORE POSITIVE ATTITUDE TOWARDS SCHOOL. FOR BOTH SEXES, THERE IS A TENDENCY FOR ENTHUSIASM FOR SCHOOL TO DECLINE WITH AN INCREASE IN AGE. (2) CHILDREN WHO ARE JUDGED BY THEIR PARENTS TO DISLIKE SCHOOL ARE GENERALLY LESS SUCCESSFUL ACADEMICALLY. (3) THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ATTITUDE TOWARD SCHOOL AND ATTENDANCE VARIES ACCORDING TO THE AGE OF THE PUPIL. PUPILS AGED 5 TO 10 DEMONSTRATE FAIRLY CONSISTENT ATTENDANCE NO MATTER WHAT THEIR ATTITUDE TOWARD SCHOOL. PUPILS FROM 11 TO 15 TEND TO BE ABSENT MORE, THE MORE THEY DISLIKE SCHOOL. (4) THERE EXISTS A HIGHLY SIGNIFICANT RELATIONSHIP, AMONG BOYS, BETWEEN BEHAVIOR AND ATTITUDE. THE BOYS WHO ARE JUDGED TO DISLIKE SCHOOL HAVE MORE BEHAVIOR PROBLEMS, ACCORDING TO THEIR TEACHERS, (5) THE SOCIOECONOMIC INFORMATION OBTAINED FROM THE PARENTS INDICATES THAT PUPILS WHO DISLIKE SCHOOL ARE MORE ANXIOUS AND MORE PRONE TO PHYSICAL AILMENTS. A HIGHER PROPORTION OF PUPILS WHO LIKE SCHOOL HAVE FATHERS IN NONMANUAL OCCUPATIONS. THIS DOCUMENT IS A REPRINT FROM THE BRITISH JOURNAL OF EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY, VOLUME 37, PART I, FEBRUARY, 1967. (WD)
Publication Type: N/A
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: N/A
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: University of London (England)