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Muñoz, Ana; Ramirez, Marta – Theory and Research in Education, 2015
Based on self-determination theory, we conducted an exploratory study aimed at identifying teachers' beliefs about motivation and motivating practices in second-language teaching at a private language center in Medellin, Colombia. To gather data, 65 teachers were surveyed; from this initial group, 11 were interviewed and observed in class during…
Descriptors: Self Determination, Theories, Teacher Attitudes, Second Language Instruction
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Chirkov, Valery I. – Theory and Research in Education, 2009
In this article I highlight recent (published after 2000) cross-cultural studies on the role of autonomous academic motivation and autonomy support in students' cognitive and psychological development. The self-determination theory (SDT) thesis of a universal beneficial role of autonomous motivation is supported by numerous empirical results from…
Descriptors: Self Determination, Social Theories, Cross Cultural Studies, Role
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Niemiec, Christopher P.; Ryan, Richard M. – Theory and Research in Education, 2009
Self-determination theory (SDT) assumes that inherent in human nature is the propensity to be curious about one's environment and interested in learning and developing one's knowledge. All too often, however, educators introduce external controls into learning climates, which can undermine the sense of relatedness between teachers and students,…
Descriptors: Teacher Student Relationship, Student Motivation, Psychological Needs, Personal Autonomy
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Reeve, Johnmarshall; Halusic, Marc – Theory and Research in Education, 2009
We discuss how K-12 teachers can put motivational principles from self-determination theory into practice. To explain the "how to" of autonomy-supportive teaching, we answer eight frequently asked questions from teachers: What is the goal of autonomy-supportive teaching? How is autonomy-supportive teaching unique? Does autonomy support mean…
Descriptors: Elementary Secondary Education, Teacher Motivation, Educational Principles, Self Determination
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Landry, Rodrigue; Allard, Real; Deveau, Kenneth – Theory and Research in Education, 2009
This article focuses on additive bilingualism for minority group children, more specifically the development of strong literacy skills in English and in the children's language. The personal autonomization language learning (PALL) model is presented. It specifies eight testable hypotheses. Self-determination theory (SDT) is central in the PALL…
Descriptors: Minority Group Children, Literacy Education, Bilingualism, Self Determination
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Ryan, Richard M.; Niemiec, Christopher P. – Theory and Research in Education, 2009
In many graduate schools of education there is strong resistance to formal theories, especially those that are supported through quantitative empirical methods. In this article we describe how self-determination theory (SDT), a formal and empirically focused framework, shares sensibilities with critical theorists concerning the importance of…
Descriptors: Schools of Education, Self Determination, Social Theories, Graduate Study
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Grolnick, Wendy S. – Theory and Research in Education, 2009
Self-determination theory identifies three dimensions of parenting--autonomy support versus control, involvement, and structure--as facilitating children's autonomous motivation in school. Research involving children of a range of ages--one-year-olds through adolescents--and from a variety of research labs supports this theory. This work is…
Descriptors: Self Determination, Social Theories, Parent Role, Child Rearing
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Alexander, Hanan A. – Theory and Research in Education, 2005
It is generally supposed that a curriculum should engage students with worthwhile knowledge, which requires an understanding of what it means for something to be worthwhile: a substantive conception of the good. Yet a number of influential curriculum theories deny or undermine one or another aspect of the key assumption upon which a meaningful…
Descriptors: Ethics, Curriculum Development, Value Judgment, Educational Theories