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Zimmermann, Leah M.; Reed, Deborah K. – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2020
The ability to comprehend informational texts is critical to students' academic success in a range of content areas. However, informational texts pose challenges to the reading comprehension of adolescents with or at risk for learning disabilities (LD). One such challenge is the use of multiple text structures in a single text. Text structure…
Descriptors: Content Area Reading, Reading Comprehension, At Risk Students, Adolescents
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Chow, Jason C.; Walters, Sharon; Hollo, Alexandra – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2020
For all children and youth, language underpins success in academic, social, and behavioral interactions. For students with language deficits, even seemingly simple tasks can be challenging and frustrating. Perhaps not surprising, children with language deficits often exhibit high rates of problem behavior, and children with behavior disorders tend…
Descriptors: Language Impairments, Behavior Problems, Student Behavior, Language Skills
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Rowe, Dawn A. – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2020
Educators are often tasked with making decisions based on a body of evidence and a sound data-based decision-making process. Teachers examine data from assessments (e.g., curriculum-based measures, formal assessments, informal interviews with students' general education teachers, writing samples, and other assessment data) and find many students…
Descriptors: Lesson Plans, Planning, Evidence Based Practice, Teaching Methods
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Gross, Kelly M. – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2020
Content literacy is necessary for students to be successful in meeting the National Core Arts Standards in the areas of creating, presenting, responding, and connecting. Art educators can with work special educators to support students with disabilities to develop disciplinary literacy using an adapted before-during-after (B-D-A) content literacy…
Descriptors: Visual Literacy, Art Education, Art Teachers, Special Education
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Becker, Patricia A. – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2020
To serve children with language impairments (LI), speech language pathologists and other educators need approaches supported by evidence (Hoffman et al., 2013). In evidence-based practice (EBP), educators integrate children's needs, strengths, interests, and preferences with research and expertise (American Speech-Language-Hearing Association,…
Descriptors: Teaching Methods, Language Impairments, Literacy Education, Visual Arts
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Rice, Mary F.; Dunn, Michael – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2020
Children with disabilities from diverse backgrounds sometimes face additional challenges with psychomotor skills (e.g., handwriting, typing), but many are linked to of lack positive experiences generating and organizing ideas (McBride, 2015). Some children do not feel they have ideas at all, and others do not think their ideas will be appreciated…
Descriptors: Inclusion, Students with Disabilities, Psychomotor Skills, Writing Instruction
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Hovland, Jessica B. – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2020
The ability to read independently is essential for success in high school, college, and most careers. Students with disabilities must be able to comprehend literally and inferentially to meet the demands of the general education curriculum and navigate the complex political, social, and economic environment of the 21st century (King- Sears &…
Descriptors: Students with Disabilities, Teaching Methods, Reciprocal Teaching, Reading Comprehension
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Patterson, Dawn R.; Hicks, S. Christy – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2020
As educators of students with autism, many teachers recognize that the day-to-day instruction is helping students learn skills to improve their quality of life, for today and in the long term. For those who teach young students, it may be difficult to project that far into the future; however, the reality is that educators want students with…
Descriptors: Autism, Pervasive Developmental Disorders, Mathematics Instruction, Vocabulary Development
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Morano, Stephanie; Randolph, Kathleen; Markelz, Andrew M.; Church, Naomi – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2020
Math fact fluency involves the quick, accurate retrieval of basic arithmetic combinations and the ability to use this fact knowledge efficiently. Math fact retrieval is typically considered fluent when performed accurately within 2 to 3 seconds, and "efficiency" refers to students' ability to apply fact knowledge to more complex…
Descriptors: Teaching Methods, Mathematics Instruction, Arithmetic, Mastery Learning
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Dazzeo, Robin; Rao, Kavita – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2020
Although the instructional strategy described in this article can be used to support all learners, the purpose of this article is to address the needs of students with learning disabilities, who are often several grade levels behind in reading comprehension. Specifically, this article explores how an explicitly taught instructional practice that…
Descriptors: Students with Disabilities, Learning Disabilities, Reading Comprehension, Reading Difficulties
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Sutherland, Marah; Firestone, Allison R.; Doabler, Christian T.; Clarke, Ben – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2020
Given the applicability of measurement to real-world problem solving and the importance of measurement understanding to accessing more advanced mathematics, improving instruction on foundational measurement skills for struggling learners is crucial. Although interventions targeting measurement have a smaller research base than other areas of…
Descriptors: Mathematics Instruction, Learning Disabilities, Students with Disabilities, Mathematical Concepts
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Jerome, Marci Kinas; Ainsworth, Melissa K. – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2020
Access to quality literacy instruction is access to acceptance into the literate community in which students with severe disabilities live and work. Providing that instruction to students with severe disabilities who are not traditional readers and writers can be challenging. Luckily, there are many easy and interactive tools available for…
Descriptors: Literacy Education, Assistive Technology, Teaching Methods, Educational Technology
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Kearns, Devin M.; Whaley, Victoria M. – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2019
Learning to read English is more difficult than in most other alphabetic languages. It sometimes seems there are not reliable rules for linking letters with sounds. Teaching students all of the letter patterns they may find in texts is no simple task. Students struggle processing the sounds in words, so even words with simple spellings are…
Descriptors: Dyslexia, Reading Skills, Spelling, Memory
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Spear-Swerling, Louise – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2019
Structured Literacy (SL) approaches are often recommended for students with dyslexia and other poor decoders (e.g., International Dyslexia Association, 2017). Examples of SL approaches include the Wilson Reading System (Wilson, 1988), Orton-Gillingham (Gillingham & Stillman, 2014), the Lindamood Phoneme Sequencing Program (Lindamood &…
Descriptors: Literacy Education, Reading Instruction, Dyslexia, Learning Disabilities
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Morano, Stephanie – TEACHING Exceptional Children, 2019
Retrieval practice may be a good fit for the needs of students with learning disability (LD) because it improves academic performance by strengthening memory (Roediger & Butler, 2011). Memory deficits are a central characteristic of LD and are linked to performance in both academic and cognitive areas (Toffalini, Giofrè, & Cornoldi, 2017).…
Descriptors: Recall (Psychology), Retention (Psychology), Transfer of Training, Students with Disabilities
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