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Pozzer, Lilian; Roth, Wolff-Michael – Cultural Studies of Science Education, 2020
As part of a series of investigations in which we explore the integration of verbal and nonverbal aspects of communication into a dialectical, sense-constitutive unit during science lectures, this study adapts the notions of catchments (i.e., repetitions of essential features of the gesture-speech dialectic) and growth points (i.e., moments in…
Descriptors: Science Education, Science Instruction, Teaching Methods, Verbal Communication
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Roth, Wolff-Michael; Jornet, Alfredo – Science Education, 2014
"Experience" is one of the most used terms in (science) education, and it is recognized as being related to learning (education). Yet "what" experience is and "how" it is related to learning and change remains untheorized. In this paper, we mainly draw on the work of J. Dewey and L. S. Vygotsky but also on M. Bakhtin…
Descriptors: Science Education, Scientific Concepts, Experience, Philosophy
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Roth, Wolff-Michael – Cultural Studies of Science Education, 2013
In much of science education research, the content of talk tends to be attributed to the persons who produce the sound-words in a speech situation. A radically different, sociological perspective on language-in-use grounded in Marxism derives from the work of L. S. Vygotsky and the members of the circle around M. M. Bakhtin. Accordingly, each word…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Secondary School Students, Language, Academic Discourse
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van Eijck, Michiel; Hsu, Pei-Ling; Roth, Wolff-Michael – Science Education, 2009
In the science education research literature, it often appears to be assumed that students "possess" more or less stable "images of science" that directly correspond to their experiences with scientific practice in science curricula. From cultural-historical and sociocultural perspectives, this assumption is problematic because scientific…
Descriptors: Student Attitudes, Biology, Literature, Science Education
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Roth, Wolff-Michael; Lee, Yew-Jin; Hsu, Pei-Ling – Studies in Science Education, 2009
Cultural-historical activity theory, an outcrop of socio-psychological approaches toward human development, has enjoyed tremendous growth over the past two decades but has yet to be appropriated into science education to any large extent. In part, the difficulties Western scholars have had in adopting this framework arise from its ontology, which…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Science Education, Teaching Methods, Transformative Learning
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Van Eijck, Michiel; Roth, Wolff-Michael – Science Education, 2007
The debate on the status of traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) in science curricula is currently centered on a juxtaposition of two incompatible frameworks: multiculturalism and universalism. The aim of this paper is to establish a framework that overcomes this opposition between multiculturalism and universalism in science education, so that…
Descriptors: Cultural Pluralism, Epistemology, Indigenous Populations, Science Education
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Roth, Wolff-Michael; Tobin, Kenneth; Carambo, Cristobal; Dalland, Chris – Science Education, 2005
In coteaching, two or more teachers take collective responsibility for enacting a curriculum together with their students. Past research provided some indication that in the course of coteaching, not only the teaching practices of the partners become increasingly alike but also do unconsciously produced ways of moving about the classroom, hand…
Descriptors: Teaching Methods, Nonverbal Communication, Team Teaching, Teacher Collaboration
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Kim, Mijung; Roth, Wolff-Michael; Thom, Jennifer – International Journal of Science and Mathematics Education, 2011
There is mounting research evidence that contests the metaphysical perspective of knowing as mental process detached from the physical world. Yet education, especially in its teaching and learning practices, continues to treat knowledge as something that is necessarily and solely expressed in ideal verbal form. This study is part of a funded…
Descriptors: Nonverbal Communication, Mathematics Instruction, Educational Research, Cognitive Processes