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Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi – Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 2012
One purpose of the present study was to examine whether self-confidence or anxiety would be differentially affected by feedback from more accurate rather than less accurate trials. The second purpose was to determine whether arousal variations (activation) would predict performance. On Day 1, participants performed a golf putting task under one of…
Descriptors: Anxiety, Feedback (Response), College Students, Self Esteem
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Badami, Rokhsareh; VaezMousavi, Mohammad; Wulf, Gabriele; Namazizadeh, Mahdi – Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 2011
Participation in sports can play many educational roles in students' personal development. However, studies have reported that interest and participation in physical education gradually declines with age (Papaioannou, 1997). Therefore, it is important to examine factors that affect students' motivation for participation in sports and physical…
Descriptors: Feedback (Response), Physical Education, Physical Activities, Student Motivation
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Wulf, Gabriele; Chiviacowsky, Suzete; Lewthwaite, Rebecca – Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 2010
This study investigated the influence of normative feedback on learning a sequential timing task. In addition to feedback about their performance per trial, two groups of participants received bogus normative feedback about a peer group's average block-to-block improvement after each block of 10 trials. Scores indicated either greater (better…
Descriptors: Feedback (Response), Peer Groups, Psychomotor Skills, Task Analysis
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Chiviacowsky, Suzete; Wulf, Gabriele; Wally, Raquel; Borges, Thiago – Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 2009
In recent years, some researchers have examined motor learning in older adults. Some of these studies have specifically looked at the effectiveness of different manipulations of extrinsic feedback, or knowledge of results (KR). Given that many motor tasks may already be more challenging for older adults compared to younger adults, making KR more…
Descriptors: Feedback (Response), Research Design, Young Adults, Older Adults
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Wulf, Gabriele – Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 2008
Performing and learning motor skills has been shown to be enhanced if the performer adopts an external relative to internal focus (or no focus) of attention (Wulf, 2007). The present study examined the generalizability of this effect to top-level performers (balance acrobats). Participants performed a balance task (standing on an inflated rubber…
Descriptors: Motor Development, Psychomotor Skills, Attention, Human Posture
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Chiviacowsky, Suzete; Wulf, Gabriele; Laroque de Medeiros, Franklin; Kaefer, Angelica; Tani, Go – Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 2008
The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the learning benefits of self-controlled knowledge of results (KR) would generalize to children. Specifically, the authors chose 10-year-old children representative of late childhood. The authors used a task that required the children to toss beanbags at a target. One group received KR…
Descriptors: Feedback (Response), Scores, Perceptual Development, Children
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Chiviacowsky, Suzete; Wulf, Gabriele; de Medeiros, Franklin Laroque; Kaefer, Angelica; Wally, Raquel – Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 2008
The purpose of the present study was to examine whether learning in 10-year-old children--that is, the age group for which the Chiviacowsky et al. (2006) study found benefits of self-controlled knowledge of results (KR)--would differ depending on the frequency of feedback they chose. The authors surmised that a relatively high feedback frequency…
Descriptors: Feedback (Response), Control Groups, Age, Foreign Countries
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Wulf, Gabriele; Su, Jiang – Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 2007
This article presents two experiments examining the effects of external focus of attention on motor performance and learning. Two main findings resulted from the present studies. First, directing learners' attention to the movement effect (external focus) can enhance learning complex, real-life skills. In contrast, wording instructions in a way…
Descriptors: Program Effectiveness, Attention, Athletics, Sport Psychology
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Granados, Carolina; Wulf, Gabriele – Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 2007
It has been shown that practice in dyads, as compared to individual practice, can enhance motor learning and increase the efficiency of practice (as two participants can be trained at the same time; Shea, Wulf, & Whitacre, 1999). The dyad practice protocol used by Shea et al. included both observation and dialogue between partners. Thus, it was…
Descriptors: Observation, Psychomotor Skills, Observational Learning, Experiments
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Wulf, Gabriele; Tollner, Thomas; Shea, Charles H. – Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 2007
The purpose of the present study was to examine whether the advantages of adopting an external focus would be seen primarily for relatively challenging (postural stability) tasks but not less demanding tasks. To examine this, the authors used balance tasks that imposed increased challenges to maintaining stability. The present results support the…
Descriptors: Difficulty Level, Attention, Interaction, Human Posture
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Chiviacowsky, Suzete; Wulf, Gabriele – Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 2007
Recent studies (Chiviacowsky & Wulf, 2002, 2005) have shown that learners prefer to receive feedback after they believe they had a "good" rather than "poor" trial. The present study followed up on this finding and examined whether learning would benefit if individuals received feedback after good relative to poor trials. Participants practiced a…
Descriptors: Feedback (Response), Handedness, Object Manipulation, Attitude Measures
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Chiviacowsky, Suzete; Wulf, Gabriele – Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, 2005
The study follows up on the contention that self-controlled feedback schedules benefit learning, because they are more tailored to the performers' needs than externally controlled feedback schedules (Chiviacowsky & Wulf, 2002). Under this assumption, one would expect learning advantages for individuals who decide whether they want to receive…
Descriptors: Feedback, Psychomotor Skills, Motor Development, Sequential Learning