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Gould, Elizabeth – Philosophy of Music Education Review, 2012
It is difficult to overstate music's persistent and uneasy relationship with homosexuality in Western society. Associated with femininity for centuries, particularly in North America, participation in music has been believed to emasculate and thus homosexualize men and boys. The linking of music to women and emotion (as opposed to men and reason)…
Descriptors: Music Education, Music, Homosexuality, Social Bias
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Gould, Elizabeth – Philosophy of Music Education Review, 2009
When women take up the work of music education, of the university, and become nomadic, engaging Deleuze and Guattari's war machine, all kinds of things happen. As nomads in music education, women traverse borders and boundaries that would otherwise limit and constrain them as they initiate alternative possibilities related to teaching and learning…
Descriptors: Music Education, Music, Females, College Faculty
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Howe, Sondra Wieland – Philosophy of Music Education Review, 2009
Women music educators in the USA have been active in public and private schools, churches, and community organizations. In the nineteenth century, Julia E. Crane founded the Crane Institute of Music, the first institution to train music supervisors; and women developed kindergarten programs throughout the US. In the "private sphere," women taught…
Descriptors: Career Choice, Private Schools, Music Education, Music
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Gould, Elizabeth – Philosophy of Music Education Review, 2005
Music education occupations in the U.S. have been segregated by gender and race for decades. While women are most likely to teach young students in classroom settings, men are most likely to teach older students in all settings, but most particularly in wind/percussion ensembles. Despite gender-affirmative employment practices, men constitute a…
Descriptors: Females, Employment Opportunities, Music Education, Gender Bias
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Koza, Julia, Eklund – Philosophy of Music Education Review, 2005
In this response to Gould, the author has two goals: first, to forward another, not necessarily competing, postmodern understanding of feminism and power; and second, to expand Gould's project of examining professional climate. Koza defines feminism as a constellation of dynamic political positions that address and attempt to change the unequal…
Descriptors: Females, Epistemology, Music, Feminism
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Zdzinski, Stephen, F. – Philosophy of Music Education Review, 2005
In this response to Gould, the author, a music education professor, acknowledges both the significant challenges that need to be overcome for future women university band directors, and the need to continue to encourage instrumental music education students (both male and female) to pursue their professional dreams and goals. He thanks Gould for…
Descriptors: Females, Epistemology, Music, Music Education
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Howe, Sondra Wieland – Philosophy of Music Education Review, 1998
Argues that there should be a broader definition of the history of music education by challenging the traditional focus of music education history. Believes that there are four alternative perspectives to the canon in music education: (1) African-Americans; (2) the female experience; (3) African-American women; and (4) music in oral traditions.…
Descriptors: Black Influences, Cultural Pluralism, Educational History, Females
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Reimer, Bennett – Philosophy of Music Education Review, 1995
Utilizes critical reaction to the book, "A Philosophy of Music Education," as a framing device to discuss feminist theory and music education philosophy. Maintains that critical criteria drawn from a specific political agenda, and applied to apolitical subjects, accomplishes little more than politicized rhetoric. (MJP)
Descriptors: Cultural Influences, Educational Discrimination, Educational Environment, Educational Objectives