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Showing 1 to 15 of 121 results Save | Export
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Sandberg-Howe, Carol – Parenting for High Potential, 2016
What parent doesn't hope to give their children "the world," and at the earliest possible age start their journey in becoming responsible global citizens? Through play, children as young as 3 years old can assume active roles in learning important cultural-historical concepts. At home, parents can provide cultural information and…
Descriptors: Gifted, Young Children, Global Education, Learning Activities
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Gadzikowski, Ann – Parenting for High Potential, 2016
In 2012, the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) revised its position statement regarding the appropriate use of technology in early childhood classrooms. The increased accessibility of touch screens on tablets and smart phones led to this revision, which moves the conversation from the question of "When shall we…
Descriptors: Coding, Robotics, Young Children, Appropriate Technology
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Shade, Rick; Shade, Patti Garrett – Parenting for High Potential, 2016
There is a myth that some people are creative and others are not. However, all children are born creative. They love to explore, ask questions, and are incredibly imaginative. Parents are key in nurturing their child's creativity in the early years. This article offers resources and strategies parents can use at different ages and stages (newborn,…
Descriptors: Creativity, Creative Thinking, Creative Development, Parent Education
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Fish, Leigh Ann – Parenting for High Potential, 2016
Precocity in the very young should be a valid topic of discussion in parental and educational circles, yet too frequently those conversations are slow to occur or are absent altogether. Many parents and educators remain silent about raising and nurturing precocious preschoolers, and author Leigh Ann Fish believe that the silence is due to a lack…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Child Rearing, Parenting Styles, Academically Gifted
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Fisher, Carol – Parenting for High Potential, 2016
Schools seem firmly rooted in the emphasis on computational mastery, and seldom seem to have time to develop other areas of mathematical thinking, such as real-world problem solving and the application of mathematical concepts. All too often, children seem to do well in math in the early grades because they easily memorize the facts and the…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Cognitive Development, Mathematical Concepts, Child Development
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Haydon, Kathryn P. – Parenting for High Potential, 2016
Sometimes it's not easy for highly creative children to "comply" with a regular curriculum, even at the preschool age. They are wired to explore, experiment, build, imagine, and create. If forced at a young age into a diet heavy on rote learning and directed work, they may struggle. It's not that these children can't do the work, it's…
Descriptors: Creativity, Parenting Skills, Child Development, Ability Identification
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Austin, Kathy – Parenting for High Potential, 2016
Many gifted preschoolers are self-taught readers. This was confirmed by more than 200 parents in a 2011 study at Oregon State University focusing on young children's reading experiences. The purpose of the study was to determine how parents of gifted children and gifted students perceived the children's learning-to-read process, their early school…
Descriptors: Reading Skills, Parent Attitudes, Reading Ability, Early Reading
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Mullet, Dianna R.; Rinn, Anne N. – Parenting for High Potential, 2016
Some gifted children suffer from Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), a neurodevelopmental disorder that impairs a child's functioning. For a diagnosis of ADHD, children under the age of 17 must display at least six symptoms of inattention or hyperactivity/impulsivity in at least two different settings (school and home, for example),…
Descriptors: Child Rearing, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Child Behavior, Academically Gifted
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Fugate, C. Matthew – Parenting for High Potential, 2016
Unfortunately, there are many students that feel "stupid" in classrooms all around the country. They know they are gifted, but their ADHD and co-occurring conditions can make them feel isolated and alone. This is hard not only for the children, but for the parents who may feel powerless in helping their child know how special he or she…
Descriptors: Creativity, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder, Parent Education, Parenting Skills
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Housand, Angela – Parenting for High Potential, 2016
Today's youth are connected across the street and across the globe in a web of communication like no other generation before. Generation Z, also known as Centennials, are considered "mobile-natives" and are even more technologically savvy then their Millennial predecessors. Nearly three-quarters of children own or have access to a…
Descriptors: Social Networks, Social Media, Handheld Devices, Adolescents
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Collins, Linda E. – Parenting for High Potential, 2016
"Twice-exceptional," also referred to as "2e," is a term used to describe gifted children who have the characteristics of gifted students and give evidence of one or more disabilities as defined by federal or state eligibility criteria. These disabilities may include specific learning disabilities (SpLD), speech and language…
Descriptors: Comorbidity, Academically Gifted, Disabilities, Technology Uses in Education
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Welch, Carolyn E. – Parenting for High Potential, 2016
The passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) in December 2015 is an exciting development for parents, teachers, school leaders, and others who believe U.S. schools should meet the needs of high-ability students. The ESSA revised and reauthorized the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA), previously known as the No Child…
Descriptors: Child Advocacy, Educational Legislation, Special Needs Students, Gifted
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Gadzikowski, Ann – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
Helping daughters recognize science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) in their daily lives, even in tasks like feeding the dog, baking a cake, or packing a suitcase, supports and encourages their STEM interests and abilities. Often young girls, even those who are very bright, aren't accustomed to thinking of themselves as being good at…
Descriptors: Females, Daughters, Parent Role, Academic Achievement
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Rimm, Sylvia – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
Educators in the field of gifted education attempt to not only accelerate curriculum for their students, but also to encourage and expand their critical and creative thinking. They often explain this creative approach to students as "out-of-the-box" thinking. "The box" is an effective analogy to help children understand how to…
Descriptors: Underachievement, Creative Thinking, Creativity, Academically Gifted
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Worley, Cassie – Parenting for High Potential, 2015
Considerable research has been published on society's expectations and attitudes toward females. Men think the most important qualities in the ideal woman are attractiveness, sexiness, and kindness. The media suggests females should value physical beauty and marriageability. Girls should be obedient, caring, pretty, and polite. These unreasonable…
Descriptors: Academically Gifted, Females, Child Rearing, Psychological Patterns
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