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ERIC Number: ED610524
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 2020-Nov
Pages: 3
Abstractor: ERIC
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: ISSN-
EISSN: N/A
Child Well-Being Spotlight: Children Living in Kinship Care and Nonrelative Foster Care Are Unlikely to Receive Needed Early Intervention or Special Education Services. National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being. OPRE Report 2020-31
Casanueva, C.; Smith, K.; Ringeisen, H.; Dolan, M.; Testa, M.; Burfeind, C.
Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation
Early intervention for children with developmental delays or disabilities may prevent future need for special education services. The Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) allows each state to establish criteria for eligibility for early intervention services for children younger than 3 years old (Part C) and special education services for children 3 years of age and older (Part B). Children meeting the criteria for Part B should have an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) for receiving special education and those meeting the criteria for Part C should have an Individualized Family Services Plan (IFSP) for receiving early intervention. Further, the federal Keeping Children Safe Act requires states to develop procedures for referring child maltreatment victims under 3 years old to early intervention services. According to the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-Being (NSCAW II), a nationally representative sample of children involved with the child welfare system (CWS), children with a condition that would potentially qualify them for Part B or C, their caregivers reported in NSCAW II that half or fewer received early intervention (IFSP) or special education (IEP) services. Unmet early intervention and special education needs are particularly large among children who are living in voluntary kinship care. Young children placed in voluntary kinship care with developmental, cognitive, or language delays identified in NSCAW assessments are significantly less likely to have an IFSP (4%) than similar children placed in nonrelative foster care (22%). Among children 3 to 17 years old, those placed in voluntary kinship care with cognitive or academic needs are significantly less likely to have an IEP (22%) than similar children placed in nonrelative foster care (54%).
Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation. Administration for Children & Families, US Department of Health and Human Services, 330 C Street SW, Washington, DC 20201. Web site: https://www.acf.hhs.gov/opre
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Administration for Children and Families (DHHS), Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE); RTI International
Identifiers - Laws, Policies, & Programs: Individuals with Disabilities Education Act; Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Part B; Individuals with Disabilities Education Act Part C; Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: Battelle Developmental Inventory; Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test; Woodcock Johnson Tests of Achievement
Grant or Contract Numbers: N/A