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Hoskins, Te Kawehau; Jones, Alison – New Zealand Journal of Educational Studies, 2022
'Indigenous inclusion' has been the most common approach to Maori engagement in university education in Aotearoa-New Zealand. Increasingly, another orientation, based on different premises, which might be called 'indigenisation', is becoming evident. We argue that indigenisation offers more hopeful possibilities for New Zealand universities as…
Descriptors: Indigenous Populations, Inclusion, Pacific Islanders, Higher Education
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Jones, Alison – New Zealand Journal of Educational Studies, 2021
How did Eruera Pare Hongi--who had an impact on New Zealand's pre-Treaty constitutional and literacy history--come to get his name? Eruera Pare is a transliteration of Edward Parry, a famous Arctic explorer, also known as Admiral Sir William Edward Parry. Why would a young Ngai Tawake man from Waimate, in the north of New Zealand, take the name of…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Biographies, Naming, Literacy
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Hoskins, Te Kawehau; Jones, Alison – New Zealand Journal of Educational Studies, 2020
Te Kawehau Hoskins (Ngati Hau) is an associate professor in Te Puna Wananga--School of Maori and Indigenous Education, and Associate Dean Maori for the Faculty of Education and Social Work at the University of Auckland. Alison Jones (Pakeha) is a professor in Te Puna Wananga. In this talk, Te Kawehau and Alison Jones discuss their entangled…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Pacific Islanders, Indigenous Knowledge, Critical Theory
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Jones, Alison; Jenkins, Kuni Kaa – New Zealand Journal of Educational Studies, 2016
Maori leaders visiting Australia invited a Pakeha (in this case, English) teacher to come to New Zealand to teach the children to read and write. On 12th August 1816, 200¬†years ago this year, the first school in New Zealand opened. Twenty-four Maori children came on that day, and each had his or her name written down. The teacher Thomas Kendall…
Descriptors: Ethnic Groups, Pacific Islanders, Foreign Countries, Schools