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Pascale, Amanda Blakewood – NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education, 2018
Much warranted attention over the past few decades has been devoted to the problem of retaining women faculty in academe, particularly in areas where they are poorly represented such as in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) fields. This study uses descriptive statistics and structural equation modeling techniques to identify…
Descriptors: Women Faculty, STEM Education, College Faculty, Teacher Persistence
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Hermann, Mary; Neale-McFall, Cheryl – NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education, 2018
Researchers have identified some of the factors that inhibit the success of mothers in academia, including overt and covert discrimination, inequitable teaching and service assignments, and the lack of policies that support combining motherhood and academic work. Pretenure mothers are particularly vulnerable, as they attempt to balance increasing…
Descriptors: Mothers, Women Faculty, Gender Discrimination, Equal Opportunities (Jobs)
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Kersh, Renique – NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education, 2018
For women administrators in higher education, workplace factors like managing multiple roles; work bleeding into personal life; issues with leadership; discrimination and marginalization; and role insufficiency (i.e., ambiguity in work roles and reduced sense of control) contribute to increased workplace stress. Individual coping responses are…
Descriptors: Work Environment, Females, Anxiety, Stress Variables
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Mena, Jasmine A.; Vaccaro, Annemarie – NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education, 2017
This study used critical ethnography to document microaggressions experienced by women Staff and Faculty of Color at a predominantly White institution of higher education. This article focuses on invisibility, a specific type of microaggression, which emerged as a prominent finding. Participant narratives explicated three manifestations of…
Descriptors: Racial Bias, Aggression, Minority Group Teachers, College Faculty
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Mena, Jasmine A. – NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education, 2016
The present study used critical ethnography and intersectionality theory to better understand the experiences of Women of Color (WOC) in the academy. WOC experience numerous and significant challenges in the academy that have the potential to stifle their career growth. Claiming increased acceptance and diversity in the academy without a…
Descriptors: Women Faculty, Womens Studies, Ethnography, Phenomenology
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Lampman, Claudia; Crew, Earl C.; Lowery, Shea D.; Tompkins, Kelley – NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education, 2016
Academic contrapower harassment (ACPH) occurs when someone with seemingly less power in an educational setting (e.g., a student) harasses someone more powerful (e.g., a professor). A representative sample of 289 professors from U.S. institutions of higher education described their worst incident with ACPH. Open-ended responses were coded using a…
Descriptors: Women Faculty, Teacher Attitudes, Higher Education, College Faculty
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Jones, Stephanie J.; Warnick, Erika M.; Palmer, Elyn M. – NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education, 2016
Fewer women attain tenure and reach the rank of professor than their male counterparts. The extant literature is rich in descriptions of barriers that women encounter while on the tenure track. This study was designed to focus on the environment of one large, public, high research university to determine the types of environmental barriers that…
Descriptors: Women Faculty, Tenure, Mixed Methods Research, Barriers
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Jones, Stephanie J.; Warnick, Erika M.; Taylor, Colette M. – NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education, 2015
Though the number of women employed in the workforce has increased, there continues to be an inequity in employment of women in the highest ranks of community colleges. Guided by gendered organizational theory, the study looked at both overt and covert knowledge of genderedness at community colleges. As one might infer, institutional genderedness…
Descriptors: Community Colleges, Work Environment, Women Faculty, Sex Fairness
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McNeely Cobham, B. Afeni; Patton, Lori D. – NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education, 2015
In the following study, the authors sought to understand how self-efficacy contributed to the career success of five tenured Black women faculty employed at two predominantly White institutions. Investigating the level of self-efficacy was significant in understanding the behavior, attitudes, and strategies of study participants. The findings…
Descriptors: Women Faculty, African American Teachers, Self Efficacy, Qualitative Research
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McNair, Delores E.; Miguel, Krystal; Sobers-Young, Shauna T.; Bechtel, Molly; Jacobson, Steve – NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education, 2013
In 2010, three women from the University of the Pacific came together for a panel presentation at the annual National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) conference to discuss their diverse experiences in student affairs. All recognized leaders in NASPA, these women reflected the rich history and promising future of student…
Descriptors: Student Personnel Services, Student Personnel Workers, Womens Studies, Females
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Gill, Kristina; Jones, Stephanie J. – NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education, 2013
Women who move into and work within administration in higher education face many struggles. Both the traits that are specific to most females and their leadership style can impede their rise into and within administrative ranks. In addition, higher education has traditionally been a hierarchical and patriarchal system that makes it more difficult…
Descriptors: Females, College Administration, Community Colleges, Leadership Styles
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Costello, Carla A. – NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education, 2012
The purpose of this study was to obtain an understanding of the impact of gendered organizations on female classified staff and their perception of climate and culture on advancement opportunities. The findings shed light on critical factors affecting the work experiences of female classified staff. The findings also offer a variety of ways…
Descriptors: Qualitative Research, Interviews, College Environment, Females
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Lampman, Claudia – NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education, 2012
In this study of a random sample of 524 professors (47% women, 83% White) from 100 colleges and universities across the United States, 91% reported at least one act of student incivility/bullying, 25% experienced at least one sexual behavior from a student, and 1-2% said a student had used or threatened them with violence in the past year. Women,…
Descriptors: Sexuality, Credentials, Bullying, At Risk Persons
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Jones, Stephanie J.; Taylor, Colette M. – NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education, 2012
Researchers have found that, although community colleges continue to remain gendered organizations, their climates and cultures are perceived to be more open to women than are their college and university peers. Community colleges may in fact still have the male orientation of the higher education system despite their efforts to be…
Descriptors: Community Colleges, School Culture, Educational Environment, Sex Fairness
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Gardner, Susan K. – NASPA Journal About Women in Higher Education, 2012
A mixed methods analysis of women faculty departure at one research institution was conducted using Hagedorn's model of faculty job satisfaction. Findings from an institution-wide survey and interviews with women faculty who had left the institution resulted in several themes: (a) a lack of resources to support faculty work, (b) a lack of…
Descriptors: College Faculty, Women Faculty, Job Satisfaction, Faculty Mobility