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Showing 106 to 120 of 148 results Save | Export
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Moscati, Vincenzo; Crain, Stephen – Language Learning and Development, 2014
Negative sentences with epistemic modals (e.g., John "might" not come/John "can" not come) contain two logical operators, negation and the modal, which yields a potential semantic ambiguity depending on scope assignment. The two possible readings are in a subset/superset relation, such that the strong reading ("can…
Descriptors: Morphemes, Epistemology, Semantics, Linguistic Theory
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Cauvet, Elodie; Limissuri, Rita; Millotte, Severine; Skoruppa, Katrin; Cabrol, Dominique; Christophe, Anne – Language Learning and Development, 2014
In this experiment using the conditioned head-turn procedure, 18-month-old French-learning toddlers were trained to respond to either a target noun ("la balle"/"the ball") or a target verb ("je mange"/"I ea"t). They were then tested on target word recognition in two syntactic contexts: the target word was…
Descriptors: French, Word Recognition, Nouns, Toddlers
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Lieberman, Amy M.; Hatrak, Marla; Mayberry, Rachel I. – Language Learning and Development, 2014
Joint attention between hearing children and their caregivers is typically achieved when the adult provides spoken, auditory linguistic input that relates to the child's current visual focus of attention. Deaf children interacting through sign language must learn to continually switch visual attention between people and objects in order to achieve…
Descriptors: Deafness, Cues, Sign Language, Infants
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Ellis, Erica M.; Gonzalez, Marybel Robledo; Deák, Gedeon O. – Language Learning and Development, 2014
Young infants can learn statistical regularities and patterns in sequences of events. Studies have demonstrated a relationship between early sequence learning skills and later development of cognitive and language skills. We investigated the relation between infants' visual response speed to novel event sequences, and their later receptive and…
Descriptors: Language Skills, Prediction, Infant Behavior, Infants
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Porritt, Laura L.; Zinser, Michael C.; Bachorowski, Jo-Anne; Kaplan, Peter S. – Language Learning and Development, 2014
F[subscript 0]-based acoustic measures were extracted from a brief, sentence-final target word spoken during structured play interactions between mothers and their 3- to 14-month-old infants and were analyzed based on demographic variables and DSM-IV Axis-I clinical diagnoses and their common modifiers. F[subscript 0] range (?F[subscript 0]) was…
Descriptors: Depression (Psychology), Clinical Diagnosis, Correlation, Infants
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Creel, Sarah C. – Language Learning and Development, 2014
Many studies have examined language acquisition under morphosyntactic or semantic inconsistency, but few have considered "word-form" inconsistency. Many young learners encounter word-form inconsistency due to accent variation in their communities. The current study asked how preschoolers recognize accent-variants of newly learned words.…
Descriptors: Suprasegmentals, Word Recognition, Language Acquisition, Preschool Children
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Omaki, Akira; Davidson White, Imogen; Goro, Takuya; Lidz, Jeffrey; Phillips, Colin – Language Learning and Development, 2014
Much work on child sentence processing has demonstrated that children are able to use various linguistic cues to incrementally resolve temporary syntactic ambiguities, but they fail to use syntactic or interpretability cues that arrive later in the sentence. The present study explores whether children incrementally resolve filler-gap dependencies,…
Descriptors: Sentences, Language Processing, Japanese, English
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Syrett, Kristen; Arunachalam, Sudha; Waxman, Sandra R. – Language Learning and Development, 2014
To acquire the meanings of verbs, toddlers make use of the surrounding linguistic information. For example, 2-year-olds successfully acquire novel transitive verbs that appear in semantically rich frames containing content nouns ("The boy is gonna pilk a balloon"), but they have difficulty with pronominal frames ("He is gonna pilk…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Verbs, Semantics, Language Research
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Altvater-Mackensen, Nicole; van der Feest, Suzanne V. H.; Fikkert, Paula – Language Learning and Development, 2014
Toddlers' discrimination of native phonemic contrasts is generally unproblematic. Yet using those native contrasts in word learning and word recognition can be more challenging. In this article, we investigate perceptual versus phonological explanations for asymmetrical patterns found in early word recognition. We systematically investigated the…
Descriptors: Word Recognition, Vocabulary Development, Language Acquisition, Pronunciation
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Majorano, Marinella; Vihman, Marilyn M.; DePaolis, Rory A. – Language Learning and Development, 2014
The early relationship between children's emerging articulatory abilities and their capacity to process speech input was investigated, following recent studies with English-learning infants. Twenty-six monolingual Italian-learning infants were tested at 6 months (no consistent and stable use of consonants, or vocal motor schemes [VMS]) and at the…
Descriptors: Infants, Language Processing, Italian, Monolingualism
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Ameel, Eef; Malt, Barbara C.; Storms, Gert – Language Learning and Development, 2014
Usage patterns for common nouns continue to change well past the early years of language acquisition in free naming (Andersen, 1975; Ameel, Malt, & Storms, 2008). The current research evaluates whether this continued evolution is shown in receptive judgments as well, given their differing cognitive demands. We found an extended learning…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Young Children, Early Adolescents, Naming
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Franklin, Beau; Warlaumont, Anne S.; Messinger, Daniel; Bene, Edina; Iyer, Suneeti Nathani; Lee, Chia-Chang; Lambert, Brittany; Oller, D. Kimbrough – Language Learning and Development, 2014
Examination of infant vocalization patterns across interactive and noninteractive contexts may facilitate better understanding of early communication development. In the current study, with 24 infant-parent dyads, infant volubility increased significantly when parent interaction ceased (presenting a "still face," or SF) after a period of…
Descriptors: Infants, Nonverbal Communication, Context Effect, Child Language
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Srinivasan, Mahesh; Snedeker, Jesse – Language Learning and Development, 2014
How do children resolve the problem of indeterminacy when learning a new word? By one account, children adopt a "taxonomic assumption" and expect the word to denote only members of a particular taxonomic category. According to one version of this constraint, young children should represent polysemous words that label multiple kinds--for…
Descriptors: Classification, Language Acquisition, Vocabulary Development, Child Language
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Jarosz, Gaja; Johnson, J. Alex – Language Learning and Development, 2013
This study is a systematic analysis of the information content of a wide range of distributional cues to word boundaries, individually and in combination, in naturally occurring child-directed speech across three languages (English, Polish, and Turkish). The paper presents a series of statistical analyses examining the relative predictive strength…
Descriptors: Cues, Young Children, Child Language, English
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Meyer, Meredith; Baldwin, Dare A. – Language Learning and Development, 2013
Generic noun phrases, or generics, refer to abstract kind categories ("Dogs" bark) rather than particular individuals ("Those dogs" bark). How do children distinguish these distinct kinds of reference? We examined the role of one socio-pragmatic cue, namely pointing, in producing and comprehending generic versus particular…
Descriptors: Cues, Nonverbal Communication, Parents, Speech Communication
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