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Showing 46 to 60 of 148 results Save | Export
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Saindon, Mathieu R.; Trehub, Sandra E.; Schellenberg, E. Glenn; van Lieshout, Pascal H. H. M. – Language Learning and Development, 2017
Terminal changes in fundamental frequency provide the most salient acoustic cues to declarative questions, but adults sometimes identify such questions from pre-terminal cues. In the present study, adults and 7- to 10-year-old children judged a single speaker's adult- and child-directed utterances as questions or statements in a gating task with…
Descriptors: Acoustics, Cues, Adults, Children
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Wojcik, Erica H. – Language Learning and Development, 2017
Two experiments investigated two-year-olds' retention and generalization of novel words across short and long time delays. Specifically, retention of newly learned words and generalization to novel exemplars or novel contexts were tested 1 min or 1 week after learning. Experiment 1 revealed successful retention as well as successful generalization…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Generalization, Vocabulary Development, Retention (Psychology)
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Lewis, Shevaun; Hacquard, Valentine; Lidz, Jeffrey – Language Learning and Development, 2017
Children under 4 years of age often evaluate belief reports based on reality instead of beliefs. They tend to reject sentences like, "John thinks that giraffes have stripes" on the grounds that giraffes do not have stripes. Previous accounts have proposed that such judgments reflect immature Theory of Mind or immature syntactic/semantic…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Beliefs, Theory of Mind, Cognitive Ability
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Bergelson, Elika; Aslin, Richard – Language Learning and Development, 2017
The present study investigated infants' knowledge about familiar nouns. Infants (n = 46, 12-20-month-olds) saw two-image displays of familiar objects, or one familiar and one novel object. Infants heard either a matching word (e.g. "foot' when seeing foot and juice), a related word (e.g. "sock" when seeing foot and juice) or a nonce…
Descriptors: Semantics, Language Processing, Infants, Language Acquisition
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Arosio, Fabrizio; Foppolo, Francesca; Pagliarini, Elena; Perugini, Maria; Guasti, Maria Teresa – Language Learning and Development, 2017
Specific language impairment (SLI) is a heterogeneous disorder affecting various aspects of language. While most studies have investigated impairments in the domain of syntax and morphosyntax, little is known about compositional semantics and the process of deriving pragmatic meanings in SLI. We selected a group of sixteen monolingual…
Descriptors: Language Impairments, Semantics, Italian, Children
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Feiman, Roman; Mody, Shilpa; Sanborn, Sophia; Carey, Susan – Language Learning and Development, 2017
For adults, "no" and "not" change the truth-value of sentences they compose with. To investigate children's emerging understanding of these words, an experimenter hid a ball in a bucket or a truck, then gave an affirmative or negative clue (Experiment 1: "It's not in the bucket"; Experiment 2: "Is it in the…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Language Acquisition, Task Analysis, Cues
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Liter, Adam; Heffner, Christopher C.; Schmitt, Cristina – Language Learning and Development, 2017
We present an artificial language experiment investigating (i) how speakers of languages such as English with two-way obligatory distinctions between singular and plural learn a system where singular and plural are only optionally marked, and (ii) how learners extend their knowledge of the plural morpheme when under the scope of negation without…
Descriptors: Morphology (Languages), Morphemes, Phonology, Language Acquisition
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Hirose, Yuki; Mazuka, Reiko – Language Learning and Development, 2017
A noun can be potentially ambiguous as to whether it is a head on its own, or is a modifier of a Noun + Noun compound waiting for its head. This study investigates whether young children can exploit the prosodic information on a modifier constituent preceding the head to facilitate resolution of such ambiguity in Japanese. Evidence from English…
Descriptors: Language Processing, Intonation, Phonology, Suprasegmentals
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Schuler, Kathryn D.; Reeder, Patricia A.; Newport, Elissa L.; Aslin, Richard N. – Language Learning and Development, 2017
Successful language acquisition hinges on organizing individual words into grammatical categories and learning the relationships between them, but the method by which children accomplish this task has been debated in the literature. One proposal is that learners use the shared distributional contexts in which words appear as a cue to their…
Descriptors: Artificial Languages, Grammar, Classification, Word Frequency
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Weatherhead, Drew; White, Katherine S. – Language Learning and Development, 2016
One of the most fundamental aspects of learning a language is determining the mappings between words and referents. An often-overlooked complication is that infants interact with multiple individuals who may not produce words in the same way. In the present study, we explored whether 10- to 12-month-olds can use talker-specific knowledge to infer…
Descriptors: Infants, Pronunciation, Eye Movements, Phonetics
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Archer, Stephanie L.; Zamuner, Tania; Engel, Kathleen; Fais, Laurel; Curtin, Suzanne – Language Learning and Development, 2016
Research has shown that young infants use contrasting acoustic information to distinguish consonants. This has been used to argue that by 12 months, infants have homed in on their native language sound categories. However, this ability seems to be positionally constrained, with contrasts at the beginning of words (onsets) discriminated earlier.…
Descriptors: Infants, Infant Behavior, Auditory Perception, Acoustics
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Song, Lulu; Pulverman, Rachel; Pepe, Christina; Golinkoff, Roberta Michnick; Hirsh-Pasek, Kathy – Language Learning and Development, 2016
Learning a language is more than learning its vocabulary and grammar. For example, compared with English, Spanish uses many more path verbs such as "ascender" ("to move upward") and "salir" ("to go out"), and expresses manner of motion optionally. English, in contrast, has many manner verbs (e.g., "run,…
Descriptors: Second Language Learning, Spanish, Verbs, Contrastive Linguistics
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Wellwood, Alexis; Gagliardi, Annie; Lidz, Jeffrey – Language Learning and Development, 2016
Acquiring the correct meanings of words expressing quantities ("seven, most") and qualities ("red, spotty") present a challenge to learners. Understanding how children succeed at this requires understanding, not only of what kinds of data are available to them, but also the biases and expectations they bring to the learning…
Descriptors: Syntax, Computational Linguistics, Task Analysis, Prediction
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Gros-Louis, Julie; West, Meredith J.; King, Andrew P. – Language Learning and Development, 2016
Many studies have documented influences of maternal responsiveness on cognitive and language development. Given the bidirectionality of interactions in caregiver-infant dyads, it is important to understand how infant behavior elicits variable responses. Prior studies have shown that mothers respond differentially to features of prelinguistic…
Descriptors: Language Acquisition, Mothers, Parent Child Relationship, Infants
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Sohail, Juwairia; Johnson, Elizabeth K. – Language Learning and Development, 2016
Much of what we know about the development of listeners' word segmentation strategies originates from the artificial language-learning literature. However, many artificial speech streams designed to study word segmentation lack a salient cue found in all natural languages: utterance boundaries. In this study, participants listened to a…
Descriptors: Phonology, Linguistic Theory, Speech, Cues
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