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Showing 1 to 15 of 43 results Save | Export
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Nomikou, Iris; Rohlfing, Katharina J.; Cimiano, Philipp; Mandler, Jean M. – Language Learning and Development, 2019
Applying an eye-tracking technique, we tested early verb understanding in 48 infants aged 9 and 10 months. Infants saw two objects presented side by side and heard a verb that referred to a common action with one of these objects (e.g., eating relating to a banana). The verbs were spoken by the parent in an interrogative manner in order to elicit…
Descriptors: Eye Movements, Verbs, Infants, Infant Behavior
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Keren-Portnoy, Tamar; Vihman, Marilyn; Fisher, Robin Lindop – Language Learning and Development, 2019
Researchers disagree as to the importance for infant language learning of isolated words, which occur relatively rarely in input speech. Brent and Siskind (2001) showed that the first words infants "produce" are words their mothers used most frequently in isolation. Here we investigate the long-term effects of presentation mode on…
Descriptors: Infants, Language Acquisition, Vocabulary Development, Teaching Methods
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Tincoff, Ruth; Seidl, Amanda; Buckley, Lauren; Wojcik, Christa; Cristia, Alejandrina – Language Learning and Development, 2019
Touch cues might facilitate infants' early word comprehension and explain the early understanding of body part words. Parents were instructed to teach their infants, 4- to 5-month-olds or 10- to 11-month-olds, nonce words for body parts and a contrast object. Importantly, they were given no instructions about the use of touch. Parents…
Descriptors: Infants, Cues, Human Body, Comprehension
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Laing, Catherine E. – Language Learning and Development, 2019
Onomatopoeia are disproportionately high in number in infants' early words compared to adult language. Studies of infant language perception have proposed an iconic advantage for onomatopoeia, which may make them easier for infants to learn. This study analyses infants' early word production to show a phonological motivation for onomatopoeia in…
Descriptors: Phonology, Auditory Perception, Infants, Syllables
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de Klerk, Maartje; de Bree, Elise; Kerkhoff, Annemarie; Wijnen, Frank – Language Learning and Development, 2019
Our aim was to investigate perceptual attunement (PA) in vowel perception of Dutch-learning infants (6-8-10-month-olds) using the hybrid visual fixation paradigm (Houston et al., 2007). Infants were habituated to one phoneme and subsequently tested on items in which a token of the habituated phoneme alternated with either another token of the same…
Descriptors: Vowels, Infants, Habituation, Phonemes
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Ferguson, Brock; Graf, Eileen; Waxman, Sandra R. – Language Learning and Development, 2018
We assessed 24-month-old infants' lexical processing efficiency for both novel and familiar words. Prior work documented that 19-month-olds successfully identify referents of familiar words (e.g., The dog is so little) as well as novel words whose meanings were informed only by the surrounding sentence (e.g., The vep is crying), but that the speed…
Descriptors: Verbs, Nouns, Language Processing, Comparative Analysis
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Hudson Kam, Carla L. – Language Learning and Development, 2018
Adult learners know that language is for communicating and that there are patterns in the language that need to be learned. This affects the way they engage with language input; they search for form-meaning linkages, and this effortful engagement could interfere with their learning, especially for things like grammatical gender that often have at…
Descriptors: Infants, Adult Learning, Grammar, Language Patterns
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Stone, Adam; Petitto, Laura-Ann; Bosworth, Rain – Language Learning and Development, 2018
The infant brain may be predisposed to identify perceptually salient cues that are common to both signed and spoken languages. Recent theory based on spoken languages has advanced sonority as one of these potential language acquisition cues. Using a preferential looking paradigm with an infrared eye tracker, we explored visual attention of hearing…
Descriptors: Infants, Sign Language, Language Acquisition, Auditory Perception
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Spelke, Elizabeth S. – Language Learning and Development, 2017
The natural numbers may be our simplest, most useful, and best-studied abstract concepts, but their origins are debated. I consider this debate in the context of the proposal, by Gallistel and Gelman, that natural number system is a product of cognitive evolution and the proposal, by Carey, that it is a product of human cultural history. I offer a…
Descriptors: Computation, Number Systems, Number Concepts, Language Usage
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Davies, Benjamin; Xu Rattanasone, Nan; Demuth, Katherine – Language Learning and Development, 2017
Many English-speaking children use plural nominal forms in spontaneous speech before the age of two, and display some understanding of plural inflection in production tasks. However, results from an intermodal preferential study suggested a lack of "comprehension" of nominal plural morphology at 24 months of age (Kouider, Halberda, Wood,…
Descriptors: Infants, Language Acquisition, English, Morphology (Languages)
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Lee, Chia-Cheng; Jhang, Yuna; Chen, Li-mei; Relyea, George; Oller, D. Kimbrough – Language Learning and Development, 2017
Prior research on ambient-language effects in babbling has often suggested infants produce language-specific phonological features within the first year. These results have been questioned in research failing to find such effects and challenging the positive findings on methodological grounds. We studied English- and Chinese-learning infants at 8,…
Descriptors: Language Acquisition, Infants, Phonology, Foreign Countries
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Kedar, Yarden; Casasola, Marianella; Lust, Barbara; Parmet, Yisrael – Language Learning and Development, 2017
We tested 12- and 18-month-old English-learning infants on a preferential-looking task which contrasted grammatically correct sentences using the determiner "the" vs. three ungrammatical conditions in which "the" was substituted by another English function word, a nonsense word, or omitted. Our design involved strict controls…
Descriptors: Infants, Language Acquisition, Vocabulary Development, Preferences
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He, Angela Xiaoxue; Lidz, Jeffrey – Language Learning and Development, 2017
The present study investigates English-learning infants' early understanding of the link between the grammatical category "verb" and the conceptual category "event," and their ability to recruit morphosyntactic information online to learn novel verb meanings. We report two experiments using an infant-controlled…
Descriptors: Verbs, Language Acquisition, Infants, Cognitive Mapping
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Bergelson, Elika; Aslin, Richard – Language Learning and Development, 2017
The present study investigated infants' knowledge about familiar nouns. Infants (n = 46, 12-20-month-olds) saw two-image displays of familiar objects, or one familiar and one novel object. Infants heard either a matching word (e.g. "foot' when seeing foot and juice), a related word (e.g. "sock" when seeing foot and juice) or a nonce…
Descriptors: Semantics, Language Processing, Infants, Language Acquisition
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Feiman, Roman; Mody, Shilpa; Sanborn, Sophia; Carey, Susan – Language Learning and Development, 2017
For adults, "no" and "not" change the truth-value of sentences they compose with. To investigate children's emerging understanding of these words, an experimenter hid a ball in a bucket or a truck, then gave an affirmative or negative clue (Experiment 1: "It's not in the bucket"; Experiment 2: "Is it in the…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Language Acquisition, Task Analysis, Cues
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