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Showing 1 to 15 of 140 results Save | Export
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Nomikou, Iris; Rohlfing, Katharina J.; Cimiano, Philipp; Mandler, Jean M. – Language Learning and Development, 2019
Applying an eye-tracking technique, we tested early verb understanding in 48 infants aged 9 and 10 months. Infants saw two objects presented side by side and heard a verb that referred to a common action with one of these objects (e.g., eating relating to a banana). The verbs were spoken by the parent in an interrogative manner in order to elicit…
Descriptors: Eye Movements, Verbs, Infants, Infant Behavior
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Stoehr, Antje; Benders, Titia; van Hell, Janet G.; Fikkert, Paula – Language Learning and Development, 2019
Bilingual children are often exposed to non-native speech through their parents. Yet, little is known about the relation between bilingual preschoolers' speech production and their speech input. The present study investigated the production of voice onset time (VOT) by Dutch-German bilingual preschoolers and their sequential bilingual mothers. The…
Descriptors: Bilingualism, Preschool Children, Linguistic Input, German
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Penido, Fabiana A.; Rothe-Neves, Rui – Language Learning and Development, 2019
An important issue regarding developmental changes in cue weighting is whether children weight the dynamic cue of vowel formant transitions relatively more than do adults, whereas adults depend more on the static cue of the fricative noise level. We investigated this issue in Brazilian Portuguese. Additionally, we inserted the segment to be…
Descriptors: Cues, Portuguese, Vowels, Pronunciation
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Keren-Portnoy, Tamar; Vihman, Marilyn; Fisher, Robin Lindop – Language Learning and Development, 2019
Researchers disagree as to the importance for infant language learning of isolated words, which occur relatively rarely in input speech. Brent and Siskind (2001) showed that the first words infants "produce" are words their mothers used most frequently in isolation. Here we investigate the long-term effects of presentation mode on…
Descriptors: Infants, Language Acquisition, Vocabulary Development, Teaching Methods
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Tincoff, Ruth; Seidl, Amanda; Buckley, Lauren; Wojcik, Christa; Cristia, Alejandrina – Language Learning and Development, 2019
Touch cues might facilitate infants' early word comprehension and explain the early understanding of body part words. Parents were instructed to teach their infants, 4- to 5-month-olds or 10- to 11-month-olds, nonce words for body parts and a contrast object. Importantly, they were given no instructions about the use of touch. Parents…
Descriptors: Infants, Cues, Human Body, Comprehension
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Jakubowski, Karen P.; Iverson, Jana M. – Language Learning and Development, 2019
Attentional difficulties are evident in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Accordingly, mothers of children with ASD may modify communication to direct their child's attention, and this pattern may generalize to later-born children. This study examined patterns of child-directed communication in 11 mothers of 18-month-old toddlers at…
Descriptors: Attention, Autism, Pervasive Developmental Disorders, Mothers
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Koulaguina, Elena; Legendre, Géraldine; Barrière, Isabelle; Nazzi, Thierry – Language Learning and Development, 2019
We examined French-learning toddlers' sensitivity to Subject-Verb agreement with conjoined subjects. In French, a conjoined NP triggers plural agreement even when made up of individual singular NPs. Processing of this infrequent structure in the input (see Corpus Analyses) requires going beyond surface patterns of non-adjacent dependencies to…
Descriptors: Syntax, Verbs, Toddlers, Language Acquisition
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Laing, Catherine E. – Language Learning and Development, 2019
Onomatopoeia are disproportionately high in number in infants' early words compared to adult language. Studies of infant language perception have proposed an iconic advantage for onomatopoeia, which may make them easier for infants to learn. This study analyses infants' early word production to show a phonological motivation for onomatopoeia in…
Descriptors: Phonology, Auditory Perception, Infants, Syllables
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Ünal, Ercenur; Papafragou, Anna – Language Learning and Development, 2019
Three experiments explored how well children recognize events from different types of visual experience: either by directly seeing an event or by indirectly experiencing it from post-event visual evidence. In Experiment 1, 4- and 5- to 6-year-old Turkish-speaking children (n = 32) successfully recognized events through either direct or indirect…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Visual Stimuli, Experience, Recall (Psychology)
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de Klerk, Maartje; de Bree, Elise; Kerkhoff, Annemarie; Wijnen, Frank – Language Learning and Development, 2019
Our aim was to investigate perceptual attunement (PA) in vowel perception of Dutch-learning infants (6-8-10-month-olds) using the hybrid visual fixation paradigm (Houston et al., 2007). Infants were habituated to one phoneme and subsequently tested on items in which a token of the habituated phoneme alternated with either another token of the same…
Descriptors: Vowels, Infants, Habituation, Phonemes
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Clark, Eve V. – Language Learning and Development, 2018
Children acquire language in conversation. This is where they are exposed to the community language by more expert speakers. This exposure is effectively governed by adult reliance on pragmatic principles in conversation: Cooperation, Conventionality, and Contrast. All three play a central role in speakers' use of language for communication in…
Descriptors: Pragmatics, Feedback (Response), Syntax, Semantics
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Hochstein, Lara; Bale, Alan; Barner, David – Language Learning and Development, 2018
We investigated "scalar implicature" in adolescents and children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to test whether theory of mind deficits associated with autism affect pragmatic inferences in language. We tested scalar implicature computation in adolescents with ASD (12-18 years) and asked whether they reason about mental states when…
Descriptors: Autism, Pervasive Developmental Disorders, Adolescents, Language Usage
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Matthews, Danielle; Biney, Hannah; Abbot-Smith, Kirsten – Language Learning and Development, 2018
Children vary in their ability to use language in social contexts and this has important consequences for wellbeing. We review studies that test whether individual differences in pragmatic skill are associated with formal language ability, mentalizing, and executive functions in both typical and atypical development. The strongest and most…
Descriptors: Children, Individual Differences, Language Usage, Executive Function
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Ferguson, Brock; Graf, Eileen; Waxman, Sandra R. – Language Learning and Development, 2018
We assessed 24-month-old infants' lexical processing efficiency for both novel and familiar words. Prior work documented that 19-month-olds successfully identify referents of familiar words (e.g., The dog is so little) as well as novel words whose meanings were informed only by the surrounding sentence (e.g., The vep is crying), but that the speed…
Descriptors: Verbs, Nouns, Language Processing, Comparative Analysis
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Hudson Kam, Carla L. – Language Learning and Development, 2018
Adult learners know that language is for communicating and that there are patterns in the language that need to be learned. This affects the way they engage with language input; they search for form-meaning linkages, and this effortful engagement could interfere with their learning, especially for things like grammatical gender that often have at…
Descriptors: Infants, Adult Learning, Grammar, Language Patterns
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