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√únal, Ercenur; Papafragou, Anna – Language Learning and Development, 2019
Three experiments explored how well children recognize events from different types of visual experience: either by directly seeing an event or by indirectly experiencing it from post-event visual evidence. In Experiment 1, 4- and 5- to 6-year-old Turkish-speaking children (n =¬†32) successfully recognized events through either direct or indirect…
Descriptors: Foreign Countries, Visual Stimuli, Experience, Recall (Psychology)
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Shum, Kathy Kar-man; Au, Terry Kit-fong – Language Learning and Development, 2017
Rapid automatized naming (RAN) robustly predicts early reading abilities across languages, but its underlying mechanism remains unclear. This study found that RAN associated significantly with processing speed but not with phonological awareness or orthographic knowledge in 89 Hong Kong Chinese second-graders. RAN overlaps more with processing…
Descriptors: Naming, Foreign Countries, Reading Ability, Phonological Awareness
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Booth, Amy E.; Alvarez, Aubry – Language Learning and Development, 2015
This work explores whether the facilitative effect of causal information on preschoolers' word and descriptive fact learning persists in school-age children. Twenty-three 5-year-olds just beginning school and 23 6- to 7-year-olds who had accumulated over a year of schooling were taught novel words along with descriptions of causally rich,…
Descriptors: Vocabulary Development, Preschool Children, Kindergarten, Grade 1
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Sera, Maria D.; Cole, Caitlin A.; Oromendia, Mercedes; Koenig, Melissa A. – Language Learning and Development, 2014
Studying how children learn words in a foreign language can shed light on how language learning changes with development. In one experiment, we examined whether three-, four-, and five-year-olds could learn and remember words for familiar and unfamiliar objects in their native English and a foreign language. All age groups could learn and remember…
Descriptors: Familiarity, Vocabulary Development, Preschool Children, Second Language Learning
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Omaki, Akira; Davidson White, Imogen; Goro, Takuya; Lidz, Jeffrey; Phillips, Colin – Language Learning and Development, 2014
Much work on child sentence processing has demonstrated that children are able to use various linguistic cues to incrementally resolve temporary syntactic ambiguities, but they fail to use syntactic or interpretability cues that arrive later in the sentence. The present study explores whether children incrementally resolve filler-gap dependencies,…
Descriptors: Sentences, Language Processing, Japanese, English
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Altvater-Mackensen, Nicole; van der Feest, Suzanne V. H.; Fikkert, Paula – Language Learning and Development, 2014
Toddlers' discrimination of native phonemic contrasts is generally unproblematic. Yet using those native contrasts in word learning and word recognition can be more challenging. In this article, we investigate perceptual versus phonological explanations for asymmetrical patterns found in early word recognition. We systematically investigated the…
Descriptors: Word Recognition, Vocabulary Development, Language Acquisition, Pronunciation
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Majorano, Marinella; Vihman, Marilyn M.; DePaolis, Rory A. – Language Learning and Development, 2014
The early relationship between children's emerging articulatory abilities and their capacity to process speech input was investigated, following recent studies with English-learning infants. Twenty-six monolingual Italian-learning infants were tested at 6 months (no consistent and stable use of consonants, or vocal motor schemes [VMS]) and at the…
Descriptors: Infants, Language Processing, Italian, Monolingualism
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Gladfelter, Allison; Goffman, Lisa – Language Learning and Development, 2013
The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of prosodic stress patterns and semantic depth on word learning. Twelve preschool-aged children with typically developing speech and language skills participated in a word learning task. Novel words with either a trochaic or iambic prosodic pattern were embedded in one of two learning…
Descriptors: Intonation, Phonology, Semantics, Vocabulary Development
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Baillargeon, Renee; Stavans, Maayan; Wu, Di; Gertner, Yael; Setoh, Peipei; Kittredge, Audrey K.; Bernard, Amelie – Language Learning and Development, 2012
Much of the research on object individuation in infancy has used a task in which two different objects emerge in alternation from behind a large screen, which is then removed to reveal either one or two objects. In their seminal work, Xu and Carey (1996) found that it is typically not until the end of the first year that infants detect a violation…
Descriptors: Infants, Cognitive Development, Thinking Skills, Investigations
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Muentener, Paul; Schulz, Laura – Language Learning and Development, 2012
Although prior research on the development of causal reasoning has focused on inferential abilities within the individual child, causal learning often occurs in a social and communicative context. In this paper, we review recent research from our laboratory and look at how linguistic communication may influence children's causal reasoning. First,…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Inferences, Toddlers, Kindergarten
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Graham, Susan A.; Booth, Amy E.; Waxman, Sandra R. – Language Learning and Development, 2012
Although there is considerable evidence that nouns highlight category-based commonalities, including both those that are perceptually available and those that reflect underlying conceptual similarity, some have claimed that words function merely as features of objects. Here, we directly test these alternative accounts. Four-year-olds (n = 140)…
Descriptors: Nouns, Preschool Children, Animals, Naming
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Barner, David – Language Learning and Development, 2012
How do children learn the meanings of number words like "one," "two," and "three"? Whereas many words that children learn in early acquisition denote individual things and their properties (e.g., cats, colors, shapes), numerals, like quantifiers, denote the properties of sets. Unlike quantifiers such as "several" and "many," numerals denote…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Number Concepts, Nouns, Inferences
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Syrett, Kristen; Musolino, Julien; Gelman, Rochel – Language Learning and Development, 2012
It is of deep interest to both linguists and psychologists alike to account for how young children acquire an understanding of number words. In their commentaries, Barner and Butterworth both point out that an important question highlighted by the work of Syrett, Musolino, and Gelman, and one that remains highly controversial, is where number…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Number Concepts, Language Acquisition, Cues