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Showing 1 to 15 of 137 results Save | Export
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Ferguson, Brock; Graf, Eileen; Waxman, Sandra R. – Language Learning and Development, 2018
We assessed 24-month-old infants' lexical processing efficiency for both novel and familiar words. Prior work documented that 19-month-olds successfully identify referents of familiar words (e.g., The dog is so little) as well as novel words whose meanings were informed only by the surrounding sentence (e.g., The vep is crying), but that the speed…
Descriptors: Verbs, Nouns, Language Processing, Comparative Analysis
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Hudson Kam, Carla L. – Language Learning and Development, 2018
Adult learners know that language is for communicating and that there are patterns in the language that need to be learned. This affects the way they engage with language input; they search for form-meaning linkages, and this effortful engagement could interfere with their learning, especially for things like grammatical gender that often have at…
Descriptors: Infants, Adult Learning, Grammar, Language Patterns
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Koring, Loes; Mak, Pim; Mulders, Iris; Reuland, Eric – Language Learning and Development, 2018
Previous studies have demonstrated that, for adults, differences between unaccusative verbs (e.g., "fall") and unergative verbs (e.g., "dance") lead to a difference in processing. However, so far we don't know whether this effect shows up in children's processing of these verbs as well. This study measures children's processing…
Descriptors: Language Processing, Verbs, Adults, Children
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Abel, Alyson D.; Schneider, Julie; Maguire, Mandy J – Language Learning and Development, 2018
Word learning from linguistic context is essential for vocabulary growth from grade school onward; however, little is known about the mechanisms underlying successful word learning in children. Current methods for studying word learning development require children to identify the meaning of the word after each exposure, a method that interacts…
Descriptors: Vocabulary Development, Diagnostic Tests, Brain Hemisphere Functions, Language Acquisition
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Hendricks, Alison Eisel; Miller, Karen; Jackson, Carrie N. – Language Learning and Development, 2018
While previous sociolinguistic research has demonstrated that children faithfully acquire probabilistic input constrained by sociolinguistic and linguistic factors (e.g., gender and socioeconomic status), research suggests children regularize inconsistent input-probabilistic input that is not sociolinguistically constrained (e.g., Hudson Kam &…
Descriptors: Sociolinguistics, Language Research, Language Acquisition, Linguistic Input
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Nicoladis, Elena; Marentette, Paula; Pika, Simone; Barbosa, Poliana Gonçalves – Language Learning and Development, 2018
These studies tested two questions about the developmental origins of children's sensitivity to iconicity with regard to number gestures: (1) whether children initially learn number gestures with sensitivity to the one-to-one correspondence between fingers and quantities or whether they learn them as unanalyzed symbols; and (2) whether sensitivity…
Descriptors: Language Acquisition, Child Development, Cognitive Development, French
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Wagner, Katie; Jergens, Jill; Barner, David – Language Learning and Development, 2018
Previous studies report that children use color words haphazardly before acquiring conventional, adult-like meanings. The most common explanation for this is that children do not abstract color as a domain of linguistic meaning until several months after they begin producing color words, resulting in a stage during which they produce but do not…
Descriptors: Color, Toddlers, Vocabulary Development, Semantics
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ter Haar, Sita Minke; Levelt, Clara Cecilia – Language Learning and Development, 2018
Infants are thought to be sensitive to frequency in the input as a cue for phonological development. However, linguistic biases such as phonological markedness have been argued to play a role too. Since frequency and markedness are correlated, the two assertions could be different interpretations of data that confound frequency and markedness. In…
Descriptors: Phonology, Teaching Methods, Preferences, Correlation
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Nordmeyer, Ann E.; Frank, Michael C. – Language Learning and Development, 2018
Adults find negative sentences difficult to process, but an informative context can facilitate processing substantially, suggesting that much of this difficulty may come from the pragmatics of negation. Are children sensitive to the pragmatics of negation as well? Although children perform poorly on many tests of negation comprehension, we argue…
Descriptors: Pragmatics, Language Acquisition, Sentence Structure, Toddlers
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Sullivan, Jessica; Bale, Alan; Barner, David – Language Learning and Development, 2018
Recently, researchers interested in the nature and origins of semantic representations have investigated an especially informative case study: The acquisition of the word "most"--a quantifier which by all accounts demands a sophisticated second-order logic, and which therefore poses an interesting challenge to theories of language…
Descriptors: Semantics, Foreign Countries, Preschool Children, Comprehension
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Arnon, Inbal – Language Learning and Development, 2018
Why do adults seem to struggle more than children in learning a second language, despite being better at a range of other cognitive skills? The source of L1-L2 differences in language learning is one of the most debated topics in the study of language. One hypothesis is that L1-L2 differences are primarily experience-based, with language learning…
Descriptors: Criticism, Second Language Learning, Language Acquisition, Age Differences
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McDonald, Margarethe; Gross, Megan; Buac, Milijana; Batko, Michelle; Kaushanskaya, Margarita – Language Learning and Development, 2018
This study tested the effect of Spanish-accented speech on sentence comprehension in children with different degrees of Spanish experience. The hypothesis was that earlier acquisition of Spanish would be associated with enhanced comprehension of Spanish-accented speech. Three groups of 5-6-year-old children were tested: monolingual…
Descriptors: Bilingualism, Monolingualism, Language Processing, English
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Stone, Adam; Petitto, Laura-Ann; Bosworth, Rain – Language Learning and Development, 2018
The infant brain may be predisposed to identify perceptually salient cues that are common to both signed and spoken languages. Recent theory based on spoken languages has advanced sonority as one of these potential language acquisition cues. Using a preferential looking paradigm with an infrared eye tracker, we explored visual attention of hearing…
Descriptors: Infants, Sign Language, Language Acquisition, Auditory Perception
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Newman, Rochelle S.; Morini, Giovanna; Kozlovsky, Penina; Panza, Sabrina – Language Learning and Development, 2018
Prior work demonstrated that toddlers can learn words from a speaker with a foreign accent and generalize that learning to the native accent when the accented variation does not cross phoneme boundaries. The current study explores the situation in which a vowel in the foreign accent is produced such that it could be confused with a different…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Speech Impairments, Dialects, Pronunciation
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Mimeau, Catherine; Dionne, Ginette; Feng, Bei; Brendgen, Mara; Vitaro, Frank; Tremblay, Richard E.; Boivin, Michel – Language Learning and Development, 2018
This twin study examined the genetic and environmental etiology of vocabulary, syntax, and their association in first graders. French-speaking same-sex twins (n = 555) completed two vocabulary tests, and two scores of syntax were calculated from their spontaneous speech at 7 years of age. Multivariate latent factor genetic analyses showed that…
Descriptors: Genetics, Etiology, Vocabulary, Syntax
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