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Maeng, Jennifer L.; Cornell, Dewey; Huang, Francis – Journal of School Violence, 2020
Threat assessment has been proposed as a method for schools to respond to student threats of violence that does not rely on exclusionary discipline practices (e.g., suspension, transfer, expulsion, arrest). The present study compared disciplinary consequences for 657 students in 260 schools using the Comprehensive Student Threat Assessment…
Descriptors: Violence, Discipline Policy, Comparative Analysis, Guidelines
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Burnette, Anna Grace; Konold, Timothy; Cornell, Dewey – Journal of School Violence, 2020
Virginia law mandates the use of threat assessment in all public schools, yet there is little research on grade-level differences. This study investigated a statewide sample of 3,282 threats from 1,021 schools. Threats significantly differed across grade level in demographics, characteristics, and outcome. As grade increased, students were more…
Descriptors: School Safety, Violence, Public Schools, Elementary Schools
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Heilbrun, Anna; Cornell, Dewey; Konold, Timothy – Journal of School Violence, 2018
The overuse of school suspensions has been linked to a host of negative outcomes, including racial disparities in discipline. School climate initiatives have shown promise in reducing these disparities. The present study used the Authoritative School Climate Survey--which measures disciplinary structure and student support as key measures of…
Descriptors: Middle School Students, Authoritarianism, Educational Environment, Suspension
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Lovegrove, Peter J.; Henry, Kimberly L.; Slater, Michael D. – Journal of School Violence, 2012
This study employs latent class analysis to construct bullying involvement typologies among 3,114 students (48% male, 58% White) in 40 middle schools across the United States. Four classes were constructed: victims (15%); bullies (13%); bully/victims (13%); and noninvolved (59%). Respondents who were male and participated in fewer conventional…
Descriptors: Middle School Students, Bullying, Victims, Student Behavior