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Showing 1 to 15 of 648 results Save | Export
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Galati, Alexia; Michael, Christina; Mello, Catherine; Greenauer, Nathan M.; Avraamides, Marios N. – Journal of Memory and Language, 2013
We examined whether people spontaneously represent the partner's viewpoint in spatial memory when it is available in advance and whether they adapt their spontaneous descriptions accordingly. In 18 pairs, Directors studied arrays of objects while: (1) not knowing about having to describe the array to a Matcher, (2) knowing about the subsequent…
Descriptors: Memory, Spatial Ability, Interpersonal Communication, Perspective Taking
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Yeung, H. Henny; Chen, Ke Heng; Werker, Janet F. – Journal of Memory and Language, 2013
Previous studies have suggested that the perception of vowels and consonants changes from language-universal to language-specific between 6 and 12 months of age. This report suggests that language-specific perception emerges even earlier for lexical tones. Experiment 1 tested English-learners' perception of Cantonese tones, replicating declines in…
Descriptors: Native Language, Phonetics, Auditory Perception, Infants
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Rodd, Jennifer M.; Lopez Cutrin, Belen; Kirsch, Hannah; Millar, Allesandra; Davis, Matthew H. – Journal of Memory and Language, 2013
Comprehension of semantically ambiguous words (e.g., "bark") is strongly influenced by the relative frequencies of their meanings, such that listeners are biased towards retrieving the most frequent meaning. These biases are often assumed to reflect a highly stable property of an individual's long-term lexical-semantic representations. We present…
Descriptors: Ambiguity (Semantics), Priming, Bias, Language Processing
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Santesteban, Mikel; Pickering, Martin J.; Branigan, Holly P. – Journal of Memory and Language, 2013
We report two experiments investigating subject-verb and object-verb agreement in Basque. Participants repeated and completed preambles containing singular or plural subjects and objects in sentences with canonical subject-object-verb (SOV) or non-canonical object-subject-verb (OSV) order; in Experiment 2, they did so while remembering two…
Descriptors: Grammar, Sentences, Word Order, Languages
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Shen, Xingjia Rachel; Damian, Marcus F.; Stadthagen-Gonzalez, Hans – Journal of Memory and Language, 2013
Some evidence suggests that the written production of single words involves not only the ordered retrieval of individual letters, but that abstract, higher-level linguistic properties of the words also influence responses. We report five experiments using the "implicit priming" task adopted from the spoken domain to investigate response…
Descriptors: Graphemes, Written Language, Responses, Priming
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Levy, Roger P.; Keller, Frank – Journal of Memory and Language, 2013
Probabilistic expectations and memory limitations are central factors governing the real-time comprehension of natural language, but how the two factors interact remains poorly understood. One respect in which the two factors have come into theoretical conflict is the documentation of both "locality" effects, in which having more dependents…
Descriptors: German, Verbs, Expectation, Memory
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Taft, Marcus; Krebs-Lazendic, Lidija – Journal of Memory and Language, 2013
The way in which letters are assigned their position when recognizing a visually presented word was examined in three experiments using nonwords created by transposing the two medial consonants of a bisyllabic baseword (e.g., "nakpin," "semron"). The difficulty in responding to such "TL" nonwords in a lexical decision task was shown to be lower…
Descriptors: Syllables, Word Recognition, Alphabets, Visual Perception
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Raaijmakers, Jeroen G. W.; Jakab, Emoke – Journal of Memory and Language, 2013
The standard textbook account of interference and forgetting is based on the assumption that retrieval of a memory trace is affected by competition by other memory traces. In recent years, a number of researchers have questioned this view and have proposed an alternative account of forgetting based on a mechanism of suppression. In this inhibition…
Descriptors: Memory, Inhibition, Interference (Learning), Theories
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McKoon, Gail; Ratcliff, Roger – Journal of Memory and Language, 2013
In the domain of discourse processing, it has been claimed that older adults (60-0-year-olds) are less likely to encode and remember some kinds of information from texts than young adults. The experiment described here shows that they do make a particular kind of inference to the same extent that college-age adults do. The inferences examined were…
Descriptors: Accuracy, Theory Practice Relationship, Young Adults, Inferences
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Tsang, Yiu-Kei; Chen, Hsuan-Chih – Journal of Memory and Language, 2013
In three priming experiments, we investigated whether the meanings of ambiguous morphemes were activated during word recognition. Using a meaning generation task, Experiment 1 demonstrated that the dominant meaning of individually presented ambiguous morphemes was reported more often than did other less frequent meanings. Also, participants tended…
Descriptors: Morphemes, Priming, Word Recognition, Morphology (Languages)
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Andrews, Sally; Lo, Steson – Journal of Memory and Language, 2013
This experiment used the masked priming lexical decision task to address previous contradictory evidence about the relative strength of priming for (i) transparent pairs (e.g., "worker" "WORK") which are morphologically and semantically related; (ii) opaque pairs (e.g., "corner" "CORN") which appear to be morphological relatives but are not…
Descriptors: Language Processing, Profiles, Spelling, Semantics
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Szewczyk, Jakub M.; Schriefers, Herbert – Journal of Memory and Language, 2013
Recently, several ERP studies have shown that the human language comprehension system anticipates words that are highly likely continuations of a given text. However, it remains an open issue whether the language comprehension system can also make predictions that go beyond a specific word. Here, we address the question of whether readers predict…
Descriptors: Comprehension, Language Processing, Prediction, Literary Genres
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Peeters, David; Dijkstra, Ton; Grainger, Jonathan – Journal of Memory and Language, 2013
Across the languages of a bilingual, translation equivalents can have the same orthographic form and shared meaning (e.g., TABLE in French and English). How such words, called orthographically identical cognates, are processed and represented in the bilingual brain is not well understood. In the present study, late French-English bilinguals…
Descriptors: Bilingualism, French, English, Language Processing
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Mickes, Laura; Seale-Carlisle, Travis M.; Wixted, John T. – Journal of Memory and Language, 2013
Although frequently used with recognition, a few studies have used the Remember/Know procedure with free recall. In each case, participants gave Know judgments to a significant number of recalled items (items that were presumably not remembered on the basis of familiarity). What do these Know judgments mean? We investigated this issue using a…
Descriptors: Accuracy, Familiarity, Recall (Psychology), Task Analysis
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White, Katherine S.; Yee, Eiling; Blumstein, Sheila E.; Morgan, James L. – Journal of Memory and Language, 2013
Young word learners fail to discriminate phonetic contrasts in certain situations, an observation that has been used to support arguments that the nature of lexical representation and lexical processing changes over development. An alternative possibility, however, is that these failures arise naturally as a result of how word familiarity affects…
Descriptors: Adults, Phonetics, Familiarity, Language Processing
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