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Moryl, Rebecca L. – Journal of Economic Education, 2021
The author of this article presents an innovative economics course based on current events and news, using "The Economist" as the primary course text. The course constructs shared learning around news in real time to inspire and excite students' ability to see economics in their world. The course supports Allgood and Bayer's…
Descriptors: Economics Education, Journal Articles, Current Events, News Media
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Bayer, Amanda; Bruich, Gregory; Chetty, Raj; Housiaux, Andrew – Journal of Economic Education, 2020
Economics does not attract as broad or diverse a pool of talent as it could. For example, women comprise less than one-third of economics bachelor's degree recipients, significantly lower than in math or statistics. The authors present a case study of a new introductory economics course that enrolled 400 students, achieved nearly 50-50 gender…
Descriptors: Introductory Courses, Talent, Economics Education, Gender Differences
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Cutler, David M. – Journal of Economic Education, 2017
Health care is one of the economy's biggest industries, so it is natural that the health care industry should play some role in the teaching of introductory economics. There are many ways that health care can appear in such a context: in the teaching of microeconomics, as a macroeconomic issue, to learn about social welfare, and even to learn how…
Descriptors: Health Care Costs, Health Services, Economics Education, Microeconomics
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Butcher, Kristin F.; Weerapana, Akila – Journal of Economic Education, 2017
One of the key advantages of attending a small liberal arts college is the opportunity to engage in research; at research universities, these opportunities are often given to graduate students. Further, smaller class sizes make it possible to personalize instruction to showcase how the tools students learn in their courses are used to answer…
Descriptors: Undergraduate Students, Student Research, Student Participation, Economics Education
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Dissanayake, Sahan T. M.; Jacobson, Sarah A. – Journal of Economic Education, 2016
Some policies try to maximize net benefits by targeting different individuals to participate. This is difficult when costs and benefits of participation vary independently, such as in land conservation. The authors share a classroom game that explores cases in which minimizing costs may not maximize benefits and vice versa. The game is a…
Descriptors: Economics Education, Cost Effectiveness, Public Policy, Educational Games
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Gajwani, Kiran; Miron, Jeffrey – Journal of Economic Education, 2015
Siegfried and Stock (2007) explore the undergraduate training of PhD economists. Their findings show that among U.S. undergraduate economics programs, the Harvard University Economics Department produces many eventual economics PhD recipients. In this article, the authors discuss Harvard's undergraduate economics program and highlight some key…
Descriptors: Undergraduate Students, Economics Education, College Programs, College Instruction
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Strasser, Georg; Wolfe, Marketa Halova – Journal of Economic Education, 2014
The authors describe their experience with integrating a semester-long economic analysis project into an intermediate macroeconomic theory course. Students work in teams of "economic advisors" to write a series of nested reports that analyze the current state of the economy, and propose and evaluate policies for a decision-maker. The…
Descriptors: Economics Education, Macroeconomics, Group Activities, Student Projects
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Mixon, Franklin G., Jr. – Journal of Economic Education, 2000
Provides background information on the Salem Witch Trials (Salem, Massachusetts) and the medical explanation of the young village girls' behavior in Salem called ergotism (bread poisoning). Presents an economic interpretation of those trials, stating that the ministers employed religious beliefs about witchcraft to maintain their churchs' monopoly…
Descriptors: Church Role, Churches, Diseases, Economic Factors