NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
Showing all 7 results Save | Export
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Howard, Lauren H.; Woodward, Amanda L. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2019
Agents are important for structuring memory in adulthood. However, it is unclear whether this "social memory bias" stems from a reliance on agents in verbal narratives, or whether it reflects more fundamental preverbal memory processes. By testing 9-month-old infants in a non-verbal eye-tracking paradigm, we were able to effectively…
Descriptors: Memory, Infants, Eye Movements, Behavior
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Friend, Margaret; Pace, Amy E. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
From early in development, segmenting events unfolding in the world in meaningful ways renders input more manageable and facilitates interpretation and prediction. Yet, little is known about how children process action structure in events composed of multiple coarse-grained actions. More importantly, little is known about the time course of action…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Adults, Motion, Cognitive Processes
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Im-Bolter, Nancie; Johnson, Janice; Ling, Daphne; Pascual-Leone, Juan – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
The current study tested 2 models of inhibition in 45 children with language impairment and 45 children with normally developing language; children were aged 7 to 12 years. Of interest was whether a model of inhibition as a mental-control process (i.e., executive function) or as a mental resource would more accurately reflect the relations among…
Descriptors: Inhibition, Children, Language Impairments, Comparative Analysis
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Russell, James; Gee, Brioney; Bullard, Christina – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2012
In a series of four experiments, the authors begin by replicating Flavell, Shipstead, and Croft's (1980) finding that many children between 2 and 4 years of age will affirm the invisibility both of themselves and of others--but "not" of the body--when the person's eyes are closed. The authors also render explicit certain trends in the Flavell et…
Descriptors: Young Children, Experiments, Eye Movements, Age Differences
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Dick, Anthony Steven – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2012
Two experiments examined processes underlying cognitive inflexibility in set-shifting tasks typically used to assess the development of executive function in children. Adult participants performed a Flexible Item Selection Task (FIST) that requires shifting from categorizing by one dimension (e.g., color) to categorizing by a second orthogonal…
Descriptors: Adults, Undergraduate Students, Cognitive Processes, Classification
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Baumgartner, Heidi A.; Oakes, Lisa M. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2011
When learning object function, infants must detect relations among features--for example, that squeezing is associated with squeaking or that objects with wheels roll. Previously, Perone and Oakes (2006) found 10-month-old infants were sensitive to relations between object appearances and actions, but not to relations between appearances and…
Descriptors: Infants, Manipulative Materials, Visual Stimuli, Auditory Perception
Peer reviewed Peer reviewed
Direct linkDirect link
Perez-Edgar, Koraly; Fox, Nathan A. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2005
Seven-year-olds completed a Posner cued attention task, under both neutral and affectively charged conditions. Compared to the traditional (affect-neutral) Posner task, performance in the affective Posner task was marked by dramatic decreases in reaction times (RTs), an increase in errors, an increased validity effect (difference in RTs to the…
Descriptors: Cues, Individual Characteristics, Attention, Cognitive Processes