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Peretz-Lange, Rebecca; Muentener, Paul – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2020
Children hold rich essentialist beliefs about natural and social categories, representing them as discrete (mutually exclusive with sharp boundaries) and stable (with membership remaining constant over an individual's lifespan). Children use essential categories to make inductive inferences about individuals. How do children determine what…
Descriptors: Childrens Attitudes, Concept Formation, Cognitive Processes, Classification
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Hala, Suzanne; McKay, Lee-Ann; Brown, Alisha M. B.; San Juan, Valerie – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2016
Hala, Brown, McKay, and San Juan (2013) found that children as young as 2.5 years of age demonstrated high levels of accuracy when asked to recall whether they or the experimenter had carried out a particular action. In the research reported here, we examined the relation of early-emerging source monitoring to executive function abilities.…
Descriptors: Young Children, Executive Function, Memory, Recall (Psychology)
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Lawson, Chris A.; Fisher, Anna V.; Rakison, David H. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2015
Young children are able to categorize animals on the basis of unobservable features such as shared biological properties (e.g., bones). For the most part, children learn about these properties through explicit verbalizations from others. The present study examined how such input impacts children's learning about the properties of categories. In a…
Descriptors: Toddlers, Animals, Classification, Prediction
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Dick, Anthony Steven – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2012
Two experiments examined processes underlying cognitive inflexibility in set-shifting tasks typically used to assess the development of executive function in children. Adult participants performed a Flexible Item Selection Task (FIST) that requires shifting from categorizing by one dimension (e.g., color) to categorizing by a second orthogonal…
Descriptors: Adults, Undergraduate Students, Cognitive Processes, Classification
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Baumgartner, Heidi A.; Oakes, Lisa M. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2011
When learning object function, infants must detect relations among features--for example, that squeezing is associated with squeaking or that objects with wheels roll. Previously, Perone and Oakes (2006) found 10-month-old infants were sensitive to relations between object appearances and actions, but not to relations between appearances and…
Descriptors: Infants, Manipulative Materials, Visual Stimuli, Auditory Perception
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Rhodes, Marjorie; Brickman, Daniel – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2011
Two studies were conducted to test the hypothesis that information about intergroup competition is central to children's representations of social categories. Children (N = 99, 5- and 6-year-olds) were introduced to two novel social categories, which were described as having competing or noncompeting goals, by varying the quantity of a resource in…
Descriptors: Competition, Social Cognition, Goal Orientation, Classification
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Oakes, Lisa M. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2010
Habituation of looking time has become the standard method for studying cognitive processes in infancy. This method has a long history and derives from the study of memory and habituation itself. Often, however, it is not clear how researchers make decisions about how to implement habituation as a tool to study processes such as categorization,…
Descriptors: Infants, Memory, Habituation, Cognitive Processes
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Christie, Stella; Gentner, Dedre – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2010
We test whether comparison can promote learning of new relational abstractions. In Experiment 1, preschoolers heard labels for novel spatial patterns and were asked to extend the label to one of two alternatives: one sharing an object with the standard or one having the same relational pattern as the standard. Children strongly preferred the…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Comparative Analysis, Cognitive Processes, Epistemology
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Nelson, Deborah G. Kemler; O'Neil, Kelly A.; Asher, Yvonne M. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2008
Two studies investigated the relationship between learning names and learning concepts in preschool children. More specifically, we focused on the relationship between learning the names and learning the intended functions of artifacts, given that the intended function of an artifact is generally thought to constitute core conceptual information…
Descriptors: Preschool Children, Classification, Correlation, Learning Processes
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Poulin-Dubois, Diane; Frenkiel-Fishman, Sarah; Nayer, Samantha; Johnson, Susan – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2006
It has been proposed that infants can form global categories such as animate and inanimate objects (Mandler, 2004). The inductive generalization paradigm was used to examine inferences made by infants about the bodily, motion, and sensory capabilities of people and animals. In Experiment 1, 14-month-old infants generalized bodily and sensory…
Descriptors: Infants, Motion, Inferences, Animals
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Honomichl, Ryan D.; Chen, Zhe – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2006
Relational similarity connects superficially dissimilar objects and events. In 2 experiments, the ability to recognize and respond to similar relations was studied in children ages 3 to 5 with 2 comparison tasks. Children interpreted illustrated pictures that shared perceptual or relational aspects and then made 2 comparison choices and…
Descriptors: Feedback (Response), Young Children, Age Differences, Cognitive Processes
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Uttal, David H.; Sandstrom, Lisa B.; Newcombe, Nora S. – Journal of Cognition and Development, 2006
An important characteristic of mature spatial cognition is the ability to encode spatial locations in terms of relations among landmarks as well as in terms of vectors that include distance and direction. In this study, we examined children's use of the relation "middle" to code the location of a hidden toy, using a procedure adapted…
Descriptors: Object Permanence, Young Children, Toys, Spatial Ability